Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,519   Posts: 1,543,778   Online: 873
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 28
  1. #11
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    That depends a lot on how you scan. Negative film "capture" a larger dynamic range but, on film, they are less contrasted than slides. Slides have a greater density range (from pure black to pure white) than negative film. Any scanner can capture all the information in a negative film frame, but not all desktop scanners can capture all the information in a slide film frame.

    That's probably why the exposure "pickness" of slide film tends to appear exaggerated when seeing scans of them.

    My experience is that with my desktop scanner I have no difficulty in capturing all the dynamic range of slide film I normally use (Astia, Sensia). That doesn't mean slides do not pose some challenges in high subject brightness range situations. That means they pose no more challenges when scanning than when projecting. If you get the exposure rights slide film is a joy to see. That is partially due to their comparatively limited dynamic range, so that there will be some "pure black" small details (recessed details). That will set a very dark "black point" in your brain and let you see the rest of the image brilliant and saturated. If there is no "pure black" in the image (if the black point is not very black) your brain sees the image as not well saturated, a bit "washed up".

    Actually, IF your subject brightness range is not extreme and IF your scanner has a very good dynamic range, slide film should be much easier to use than negative film, I mean it's much easier to get natural and pleasing colours, probably because of the above mentioned reason (and for some others as well).

    Be very careful in using slide film as a "back up". Slides want to be exposed for highlights. Negatives should better be exposed for shadows (and are generally speaking more forgiving as well). When you use slide film you have to be very "aware" that you are using slide film, any moment, when evaluating exposure. Overexposing a slide in a high subject brightness range situation normally results in a disaster.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  2. #12
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SE Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,578
    Images
    15
    Expose slide film carefully with no blown highlights and no blocked shadows and it will scan beautifully. I rarely scan C41 unless I'm sending copies of snapshots to rellies. All fine art work though takes place on Velvia and is drum scanned. Bewdifully.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  3. #13
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,324
    Images
    225

    Slide or print film? for scanning.

    I skimmed some of this but I didn't see anyone discuss palate with regard to skin tones, many slide film palates that still exist are not skin tone friendly. It's landscape film.

    So I wouldn't shoot people unless its Astia and POSSIBLY Provia100f if they don't have a bad fake tan

    There has to be some film somewhere you can use? Good luck!


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  4. #14
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SE Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,578
    Images
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I skimmed some of this but I didn't see anyone discuss palate with regard to skin tones, many slide film palates that still exist are not skin tone friendly. It's landscape film.

    So I wouldn't shoot people unless its Astia and POSSIBLY Provia100f if they don't have a bad fake tan

    There has to be some film somewhere you can use? Good luck!


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk


    Provia 100F is OK for skin tones.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  5. #15
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,324
    Images
    225

    Slide or print film? for scanning.

    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Provia 100F is OK for skin tones.
    Yea that's why I said avoid using it on recently tan women (pale only), or they look like they belong in a star trek episode haha


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  6. #16
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I skimmed some of this but I didn't see anyone discuss palate with regard to skin tones, many slide film palates that still exist are not skin tone friendly. It's landscape film.
    I think you mean palette, although a skin tone can be very palatable as well

    Astia is as far as I know derived from Accurate Skin Tone, Ast... followed by the suffix "ia" which become the Fuji way to say "film" (actually meant to say "slide film" but then way "Superia" is a negative film? I don't understand that).
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,601
    My two cents worth : learn to print color neg in the darkroom. Then you don't have to worry about all
    this scanner nonsense with half-baked results. Otherwise, farm it out to someone with a serious quality scanner. But heck, I did portrait commissions on Cibachrome, so yeah, slide film can be bent all kinds of directions. But portrait work is far easier using a color neg film like Portra and RA4 paper.

  8. #18
    Athiril's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,523
    Images
    28
    Since this discussion has shifted towards scanning aspects, I shall talk about scanning a bit..

    Flatbed scanners: Terrible resolution, terrible SNR (hence why shadows are poor on slides on them, even though technically within the range captured by the scanner).

    You can actually improve both resolution and SNR with software technique. SNR simply by stacking (dont use VueScan multipass, it doesn't align your images and blurs them even more) which greatly improves SNR if you wish to dig into shadows.. for resolution you have to go a bit further and use superresolution technique, but it requires more than a single sample of a scene, but luckily for us our scene doesn't change (the film).

    Superresolution legitimately overcomes deficiencies in an optical system, legitimately overcoming both resolving power and diffraction limits (or going around them perse).

    Here is a flatbed 3200 dpi scan crop from Velvia 50 (That I shot at 25 and pulled 1 stop as it was expired and I was worried a little).




    Here is the same shot, with multi-sample superresolution applied



    Similar area shown from some other scanners:



    There is more details how I did it at http://rangefinderforum.com/forums/s....php?p=2098918

    Only 2 passes are needed to achieve the results from some testing I've found.

    Quote Originally Posted by AOCo View Post
    I find that negative film is very good for fine grain, high latitude, but I've never found a satisfying way to scan them, and get decent colors.
    There are tons of methods out there on the web, I tried many of them, but never was quite satisfied.
    It's actually quite easy to do and takes seconds. People seem to resort to complex time consuming tasks though.
    Last edited by Athiril; 04-18-2013 at 11:58 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    My two cents worth : learn to print color neg in the darkroom. Then you don't have to worry about all
    this scanner nonsense with half-baked results. Otherwise, farm it out to someone with a serious quality scanner. But heck, I did portrait commissions on Cibachrome, so yeah, slide film can be bent all kinds of directions. But portrait work is far easier using a color neg film like Portra and RA4 paper.
    Second that.

  10. #20
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,324
    Images
    225

    Slide or print film? for scanning.

    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    I think you mean palette, although a skin tone can be very palatable as well

    Astia is as far as I know derived from Accurate Skin Tone, Ast... followed by the suffix "ia" which become the Fuji way to say "film" (actually meant to say "slide film" but then way "Superia" is a negative film? I don't understand that).
    Astia isn't available any longer... Lol

    And you're right, I'm a horrible speller


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin