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  1. #1

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    Slide or print film? for scanning.

    Hey guys,

    I have a shoot this weekend and typically I gravitate toward Fuji Print 120 film for scanning. However.. I went to my local camera store and they are out of Fuji Print film or any other manufacturer of 120. However they had slide film from Fuji. Would I be OK scanning that as a back up roll?

    ToddB

  2. #2
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    I think other APUGers might have a different opinion. In general, color negative film has better latitude. You can over expose neg film by a stop and a half and you still get decent scans. If you over expose chrome film, you'll blow out your highlights. I think chrome film is a bit sharper.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  3. #3

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    Thats what I was thinking.. I'll conserve what I have or give them a call on friday to see if their supplies came in.

    ToddB

  4. #4

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    I find both can scan very well, print film tends to be incredibly forgiving of over exposure, slightly forgiving of underexposure. Slide film forgives neither. However I think if you get the exposure right, slide film can look amazing. For scanning, I've had good luck with both.

  5. #5
    AOCo's Avatar
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    I find that negative film is very good for fine grain, high latitude, but I've never found a satisfying way to scan them, and get decent colors.
    There are tons of methods out there on the web, I tried many of them, but never was quite satisfied.
    Last edited by AOCo; 04-17-2013 at 11:41 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6

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    I think the exposure pickiness of slide film is a *little* exaggerated, perhaps because of specific films like Kodachrome and Velvia that are notorious for it. With lower-contrast E-6 films like Provia, the latitude is less than negative/print film, but it isn't outrageous---typical in-camera meters, in my experience, do just fine with it. I avoided shooting slides for a long time because of the fear that my exposure skills weren't up to it, and when I finally took the plunge I found that after all it wasn't a big deal in that respect.

    Scanning is theoretically off-topic, so let's suppose that you wanted to *project* your film. Onto a very small screen. With light sensors in it. :-) I'm being a little silly, but that *is* basically what film scanning is...I find the convenience of having no orange mask, and not having to fiddle around with the color balance for different films, is a big win. It's obviously possible to use either type of film, finishing in the analog or d*g*t*l domains, for excellent results---people do all of these things all the time---but given my balance of time, skills, interests, and viewing criteria, I usually end up prioritizing convenience for the "finish" stages.

    (I'll invest any amount of time in the "front-end" shooting and developing stages, though. Hand-coated emulsion that has to be refined on the spot from unicorn tears and coated with a yeti-hair brush onto a technetium-iridium substrate hand-harvested from comets? I'm there! :-)

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  7. #7
    AOCo's Avatar
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    Just read Nathan's post. I guess that's a good point : orange mask gives a white point reference which is good. I just don't find the colors very saturated, or natural looking. Maybe I should try other films.

    I also confirm that films like Provia 400X can handle a fair amount of over-exposure (1,5 EV).

  8. #8
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    I think with Japanese color film and paper have that saturated "Japanesey" look which is saturated. I used to use Kodak EPP chrome for my client work which required neutral colors and Fuji RTP for personal work.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  9. #9
    Lionel1972's Avatar
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    Given the consumer type of scanners I can afford, I have never been really satisfied with what I get from mine with C41 negs. For E6, scanning is easier and the results are most of the time very pleasing (unless the slide is very underexposed). On the other hand I love the results I get with Portra when I let the local photostore process and scan them on Fuji Frontier minilabs. I wish I could afford my own Frontier SP2500 or SP3000 just for shooting Portra in 120. I'd like to try wet printing color negs on RA4 paper now. From what I've seen of it, the results are far more satisfying then scanning (or at least what I can achieve with my scanners).

  10. #10
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    My 2 cents - spend the bucks on ViewScan, if all you got was Epson Scan or a hobbled oem version of Silverfast with your scanner.

    Viewscan - in advanced mode takes a bit to learn, but it puts you, and not some automated wizard, in control of your scanners interpretation of the scanned output.

    It also has an automated mode that works well for most images.

    The up side of ViewScan is that it supports older scanners who had vendors that did not update their offering for the latest operating system requirements.

    Just a twain driver and you are away to the races with your old scanner off of the local craigslist or camera club listings - 'next to free boat anchor for those running older o/s people'.
    my real name, imagine that.

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