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  1. #1

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    Local Color Dodging, what filters to use ?

    Hi,

    Let's say I print a portrait and skin tone is good, however there seem to be a magenta cast in the hair. I am being told that this is not all that uncommon, and local dodging is required. Are Color Compensating Filters (CC) used for this under the lens. ? as opposed to use CP filters or Dichroic Head (which is the two things I have). if so, should I buy MAGENTA, YELLOW and CYAN, / RED, BLUE and GREEN or all of them.
    any additional recommendations to improve these situations.

    thanks,

    PS: I have Beseler CII-XL dichroic and another condenser head (with drawer). I print with Kodak RA-4 room temp. just in case this information is needed. The paper that gave me this issue was Fuji Crystal Type PIII which I happen to like the look of it.

  2. #2

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    Yes, but the specifics would take a bit of experimentation and practice. Remember that in this case
    your dodging will not only affect local color, but will equate to density dodging a the same time, and somewhat lighten the parts of the image you are tinkering with.

  3. #3
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Local dodging with filters is a practice many have used.

    If you are getting a magenta cast in hair when everything else is correct your process is off.
    Contrary to what you are being told this is not what one would expect with correctly exposed film and process colour negative.

    If this is isolated case then don't sweat it too much and try dodging out the unwanted colour, if this is happening to all your film, you should revisit how things are being done.

    good luck

  4. #4

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    Could be the original lighting. Some hair dyes do pretty strange things under artificial light.

  5. #5

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    ok , so CC gelatin filters are the right type for this ? and my other question was, should I buy all of the ones I listed above ? or just MAGENTA, YELLOW and CYAN ? or just RED, BLUE, GREEN will suffice ?

    Do you guys ever do local dodging ? or rarely. ?

  6. #6
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    If it's a magenta cast, use a magenta filter. You'll have to experiment with the filter strength. You can do it the cheaters way by scanning the neg, correct the cast in photoshop and do a digital print.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    If it's a magenta cast, use a magenta filter. You'll have to experiment with the filter strength. You can do it the cheaters way by scanning the neg, correct the cast in photoshop and do a digital print.
    The "cheaters way" is is the only way I can do it today but if I were still printing darkroom colour it would remain my preference.

    Unless a magenta light source was used somewhere in the scene it is odds-on to be a neg development problem. I used to use this technique a lot to get some of the excessive red out of certain peoples' faces and up to modest print sizes eg 11x14 you can get away with using clean, unscratched CP filter material if you have any and don't want to buy CC but a catch with CP is that it only comes in the complimentary colours - you have to use two to make red green and blue. The issue of density modification mentioned by another poster is a very real one that will possibly spoil your first few attempts. OzJohn

  8. #8
    polyglot's Avatar
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    I think you've probably got under-exposed film. Film can get nasty casts in shadows where it drops off the toes of the different dyes differently, especially where the light is not white. Or if this is not right on the edge of blackness, your C41 process is out of control.

    As to your question, why not just use the filters in the enlarger? Obviously (?) you're using a colour enlarger.

    As to the colour to use, this is (unless I'm mistaken) counter-intuitive. If you were burning the hair down, you'd use a magenta filter to take out the magenta cast, but you're dodging. That means you need to use a more-magenta filter for the main exposure (including the hair) and then a more-green filter for everything but the hair to bring the skintones back to neutral. Look at it backwards: dodging the hair is the same as burning the face and background. So you pick a base exposure to get the hair right, then burn in the face and background with a greener filter to take out the green cast you introduced in the main exposure. Hope that makes some sense...

  9. #9

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    Polyglot, it is interesting that you said on the edge of blackness. This happens to be a portrait of a dark hair on pure black backdrop. I bounced some light off white ceiling from my flash to throw some separation light on her hair. Assuming that the cast was created during exposure or during film processing, how can I learn to detect this cast on film before printing.... my eyes dont have that level of expertise. and how to avoid next time. ??

    So having said this, yes your burning/dodging explanation makes sense, I just need to practice it. and lots of paper may go to waste in the process...

  10. #10

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    I know how to do it, and have demonstrated that experimentally. But I never need to do it, so it's a tool I never actually use. But if I did, I would not be using gels within the lightpath. I'd simply use an
    opaque burn card with a cutout and temporarily reset the colorhead to the appropriate values.

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