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  1. #1

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    Left Portra 400 film in the car today in 84 degree weather, how bad was that?

    It got unusually warm today and I forgot about the film in the bag and in the camera.

    How bad was this?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Fixcinater's Avatar
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    Is it otherwise fresh?

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fixcinater View Post
    Is it otherwise fresh?
    Its expiry date is 04/2014

  4. #4
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Do not worry about it. It was a one time event. Film is more stable than that.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  5. #5
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    I'd worry if it was an overnight low of 94 F. But a daytime high of 84? Nothing to worry about. Several weeks of that? Yes, I'd start worrying. But not one afternoon.

  6. #6

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    I once oversaw some "heat aging" tests on Portra's immediate predecessor, VPSIII. Basically, the film spent time in a "hot box" at 140 deg F, then was tested at various intervals by exposing a sensi wedge, which was processed and evaluated.

    As I recall, the VPSIII showed no changes at all, until somewhere around 300-400 hours, at which time it started going downhill at a steady rate. This behaviour was nothing like you would expect based on Internet lore.

    My guess is that Portra film would have similar (or better) characteristics, such that 10 hours or so, possibly reaching 100 or 110 deg F in your trunk would have a negligible effect on the film.

  7. #7

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    Film's tough, man.
    The camera is the most incidental element of photography.

  8. #8

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    Thanks everyone, you have been totally awesome!

  9. #9

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    Rcently processed the film from a Kodak disposable camera (400ASA) which had been in the bottom of a car luggage compartment for about 2 years in all temperatures. The first half of the film (shot about 10 years ago!) was poor, the second half, shot last autumn was as good as fresh film! (And the process by date was Sept 2005!)

  10. #10

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    I left some Kodak BW400CN in my glove box for a couple years, this was in Utah where it gets over 100F. It came out okay except it had some pastel pink and green splotches when printed on color paper. It was actually kind of pretty. Didn't notice an effective loss in speed or a change in contrast, but then I don't really shoot that stuff very often.

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