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  1. #11
    JLP
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    May i recomend to do some search here on APUG. There is an extensive thread on the Rollei Digibase C41 kit which is excellent. I have used it the last couple of years and it gives very nice clean negatives.
    As also discussed at lenght here on APUG, avoid kits using blix, go for a kit with separate bleach/fix chemistry.
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  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by dotyj View Post
    ...
    I find my results to be quite good though my first attempts weren't as good as I'd have liked.Attachment 68100

    I took this photo last week using an old Canon 110ED 110 pocket film camera. I think the results are very good.
    The scanning also plays an important role here. Try no to use automatic dust removal etc. I find they can reduce the sharpness of the picture. For testing you could rescan in B/W to see what the neg really contains.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by emjo View Post
    The scanning also plays an important role here. Try no to use automatic dust removal etc. I find they can reduce the sharpness of the picture. For testing you could rescan in B/W to see what the neg really contains.
    That's an excellent idea. I'll give that a try.

    The photo I showed is from a 110 camera. That's a pretty small negative. In this case I didn't use my scanner, I used my film to digital USB camera. I'm not sure what to call it since it's a 5MP camera in a box that allows me to photograph negatives.

    I don't have a 110 film holder for my scanner but I do for that camera in a box so I used that to capture that roll of film. I'm careful to clean the camera box and blow off the negative with one of those rocket shaped bulbs.

    The image is a bit fuzzy. Green seems a tad blue to me but the colors are vibrant so I love the image.

    Perhaps when I go to buy more C-41 chemicals I'll try separate bleach and fix.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by JLP View Post
    As also discussed at lenght here on APUG, avoid kits using blix, go for a kit with separate bleach/fix chemistry.
    BLIX ?? Is that bleach and fix in one?? As in one bath instead of two separate baths?
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
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    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  5. #15

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    Yes.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by dotyj View Post
    ...
    I don't have a 110 film holder for my scanner but I do for that camera in a box so I used that to capture that roll of film. I'm careful to clean the camera box and blow off the negative with one of those rocket shaped bulbs.

    The image is a bit fuzzy. Green seems a tad blue to me but the colors are vibrant so I love the image.

    Perhaps when I go to buy more C-41 chemicals I'll try separate bleach and fix.
    If you have a flatbed scanner you can put the neg directly on the glass, then perhaps another piece of glass on top if the film is curly. What I noted about the image is that the details are "oil painting"-like, which is probably the scanning in some way.

    Colours are almost always a bit off - but it does give it some personality. "Off-colour scan" is my middle name

  7. #17
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    Hi everyone,
    Thanks so far for all the replies. I think I'll test the Rollei Digibase 1 Ltr. kit from Maco, see:
    http://www.macodirect.de/digibase-mi...21-p-2340.html
    Not too expensive (EURO 29.81 = USD 36) for try outs and enough to test 20 films (= being able to waist the first 19 in my case). This set has also a separate bleach and fix (as recommended).

    I still have questions about the temperatures. All right - I agree - it is best to do my first testing at recommended temperatures. I can tinker something together to make a nice & constant warm bath for the bottles with chemicals.

    1) If I do use the recommended 38 degrees Celsius, I suppose I don't keep the film tank in the bath as well, since I have to agitate/invert the tank almost constantly? Won't it cool down too much? I read that someone started at higher temps to compensate. What do you do?

    2) But is there anyone who has decent results with lower temps? Are colours going a bit off in an acceptable (= artistic?) range, or not at all? The original instruction manual even gives times for developer at 20, 25, 37.8 and even 45 degrees Celsius.
    See: http://www.macodirect.de/download/C4...tionManual.pdf

    Thanks,
    Bert from Holland
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  8. #18
    bvy
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    I use a Paterson tank and tempered water bath (in a small portable cooler). I keep the water bath at about 118F, give or take a few degrees. I pour the developer (at about 101F) into the tank and immediately put the tank into the water bath. The level of the water bath should be about the same as the full tank, so that it won't float. Anyway, I do twirl stick agitation for the first 30 seconds, then put the lid on the tank. I invert every fifteen seconds -- quickly. That is, the tank comes out and gets two very quick inversions (with about a quarter turn between) before going back into the water bath. This goes on for the duration of the developing time. Every fourth inversion stop or so, I might end with a quick tap to release any air bubbles on the film (as in black and white), though things happen so fast with C-41 developing, I'm not sure how necessary this is.

    118F might sound hot, but with inversions taking between two and three seconds, the tank is out of the water bath about 20% of the time. In any case, it's after regular and repeated test runs (with water) that I came up with this process. I'm measureing the temperature in the middle and at the end of the developing time. This is with 500ml of developer and an ambient temperature of about 68F.

  9. #19

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    I can get a small sheet of glass at my local hardware store, they custom cut. I'll give it a try.

    Yeah, my negative to digital camera isn't the best way to get film to computer so I bought the scanner. I can get a 16mm film holder but they're $75 so I've been dragging my feet on that purchase.

  10. #20

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    Like I said, and others have their own methods, I use a shallow baking pan suspended over the sink, the sides are just wide enough with my sink to strattle the sink.

    I use a Peterson film tank when developing color film, it has an agitation stick and I can leave the film tank in the baking pan during processing. Though I do remove the film tank from the pan long enough to tap out bubbles.

    My Yankee Clipper tank I use for 16mm film doesn't allow for inversion so it has to be agitated using the agitater/thermometer it came with.

    My baking pan is maybe two and half inches deep.

    I've gotten good results using this method.

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