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  1. #11

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    Provia 100F is also my standard color film. It pushes well with a slight (and I do mean slight) shift toward red in skin tones, and blue skies shift ever so slightly towards purple in the evenings. When I do this I expose at 320 and ask the lab for a 2 stop push.

    Velvia (I use 100) is nice for spring flowers and fall foliage, the rest of the time I'm in Provia-land when I'm shooting color.
    ME Super

    Shoot more film.
    There are eight ways to put a slide into a projector tray. Seven of them are wrong.

  2. #12
    cooltouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ME Super View Post
    Provia 100F is also my standard color film. It pushes well with a slight (and I do mean slight) shift toward red in skin tones, and blue skies shift ever so slightly towards purple in the evenings. When I do this I expose at 320 and ask the lab for a 2 stop push.
    How about the grain when you push Provia? Any noticeable change?

    I'm wondering as well, is there any advantage to pushing 100F as opposed to just using Provia 400X?

  3. #13

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    I would not hesitate to use Provia 400X in medium format, especially 6x6 or 6x7. If you shoot handheld with a Pentax 6x7 like I do, the extra two stops of shutter speed can make a very big difference. The grain is incredible for a 400 film, in my opinion. If only we had the stuff 25 years ago, I wouldn't have used Velvia at all. I also agree that Velvia 50 especially and most slide films in general do not like under-exposure. Velvia is too warm and contrasty for portraiture in normal lighting, but it is excellent for nature and landscapes. One thing though is to evaluate the shadows carefully. If they are important, then you have to consider using a different film. If you can sacrifice or ignore them, then no problem. Of course nothing prevents you from changing a rendition after scanning, but your basic exposure has to be good, and one can do very little about morbid shadows even with the best of scanning technique and equipment. Astia is a good film, and I (like many) rue the fact that it has been discontinued. If you can still get hold of some, it would be worth it. I used Ektachrome a long time ago, and it was too blue for my liking. The recent ones were much better, but alas, they are gone.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by cooltouch View Post
    How about the grain when you push Provia? Any noticeable change?

    I'm wondering as well, is there any advantage to pushing 100F as opposed to just using Provia 400X?
    I shoot slides for projection, and no, I honestly don't see a difference in grain when projecting at 2'x3'. I've not shot 400X yet. Usually when I think "I need 400 speed film" it's too close to the time I'll need it to order from B&H so I just push the 100F to 320. Shooting 400X at box speed would get me an extra 1/3 stop though, and probably less contrasty than pushing 100F 2 stops.
    ME Super

    Shoot more film.
    There are eight ways to put a slide into a projector tray. Seven of them are wrong.

  5. #15
    tsiklonaut's Avatar
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    For me it's been Provia 400X as the best "allround" film, you can push or pull it and for an ASA400 film it's got very fine grain indeed - I shoot MF and ASA400 lets me shoot most of shots handheld without worring. Its got fairly good DR for a E6 film, plus capable of shooting people when you need to and very good reciprocity properties.


    Wind's Painting by tsiklonaut, on Flickr



    Frozen landscape by tsiklonaut, on Flickr


    Provia 100F was my preferred film for many years, until I really got too much into 400X. Probably because I use a lot of polarizer filter (-2 fstops), so ASA100 can limit my handheld shots. But I love Prova 100F from every angle, so maybe I have to re-visit 100F and just use more tripod...

    Obviously like many, Velvia 100 I like for landscapes, sunsets sunrises, dawns (V100 has good reciprocity properties unlike Velvia 50), Velvia 50 for daylight landscapes - it has the most "syrreal" colours that can benefit those rather dull light conditioned scenes without going overboard.


    Tanjung Aan beach by tsiklonaut, on Flickr



    And for very artistic shots: nothing beats the Kodak (EIR) Aerochrome colour infrared slide


    Motorcycling dream (drum scan) by tsiklonaut, on Flickr





    Sandra & Sentos by tsiklonaut, on Flickr


    Cheers,
    Margus

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