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  1. #11
    pentaxpete's Avatar
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    Here is some 1987 dated Kodak Vericolor III 160 ASA I was given -- it HAD been refrigerated by a Pro photographer who was Emigrating. I rated it at 32 ASA with my PENTAX 6x7 MK II and processed for 30 seconds longer in C41 chemicals -- they came out well .

    Weald 7 by pentaxpete, on Flickr

    Weald 1 by pentaxpete, on Flickr
    Here is some outdated Fuji Provia 100 I keep in the 'fridge

    Barbie by pentaxpete, on Flickr
    Here is some 2005 dated Fuji Provia 100 CROSS-PROCESSED in C41

    XPro Telephone by pentaxpete, on Flickr
    An 'Old Dog still learning New Tricks !

  2. #12
    Klainmeister's Avatar
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    Oh wow, those did turn out well. I feel stupid for not knowing that Vericolor is C41, but hey, I was 6 years old when it was manufactured...
    K.S. Klain

  3. #13
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klainmeister View Post
    Oh wow, those did turn out well. I feel stupid for not knowing that Vericolor is C41, but hey, I was 6 years old when it was manufactured...
    That's not the most confusing part about Vericolour, the worst thing is that there were a few things that used the same name. Some of it was iso160 C41 regular film.
    But there was another type that was iso3 or something stupidly slow, called 'internegative'. Basically, it was for making slides out of negatives, on a macro-duplicating setup (or 'contact-printed' on an enlarger). You put a processed negative in one end, this vericolour in your camera, and snapped. Processed it in regular c41 chemicals, and you got slides out of it (negative of a negative is a positive). But because regular negatives are orange, to make a clear-base slides out of all that orange, the slow vericolour was green base (green-orange=clear, or something).
    Anyway, long story short, I got a dayroller off ebay, and it had something left in it, the extremely old sticker said 'vericolour', so I put it in 3 canisters and shot one, thinking it was the iso160 regular vericolour. Turns out it was the slow one, all I got was a totally underexposed roll of green out of it... (and I've got 2 rolls left over, not sure what to do with them)
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

    f/64 and be there.

  4. #14

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    make solar graphs / lumen prints from them !

    i saw some over on flickr that were fixed + developed and fixed again
    color film ... some of the most beautiful photographs i have ever seen !

  5. #15
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Croubie View Post
    That's not the most confusing part about Vericolour, the worst thing is that there were a few things that used the same name. Some of it was iso160 C41 regular film.
    But there was another type that was iso3 or something stupidly slow, called 'internegative'. Basically, it was for making slides out of negatives, on a macro-duplicating setup (or 'contact-printed' on an enlarger). You put a processed negative in one end, this vericolour in your camera, and snapped. Processed it in regular c41 chemicals, and you got slides out of it (negative of a negative is a positive). But because regular negatives are orange, to make a clear-base slides out of all that orange, the slow vericolour was green base (green-orange=clear, or something).
    Anyway, long story short, I got a dayroller off ebay, and it had something left in it, the extremely old sticker said 'vericolour', so I put it in 3 canisters and shot one, thinking it was the iso160 regular vericolour. Turns out it was the slow one, all I got was a totally underexposed roll of green out of it... (and I've got 2 rolls left over, not sure what to do with them)
    Internegative film was used to make printable negatives from transparencies. You would essentially take a photo of your slide using the internegative film, and then print from that negative. S

    A properly prepared internegative made it possible to obtain very high quality prints from slides.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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