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  1. #11
    Wally H's Avatar
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    Assuming one wants no "enhanced" color to the slide, Kodak's EPN slide film is the most neutral film I found, however, I have not shot art work for a couple of years, so I've no experience with any of the newer films. Most new films seem to promote themselves as some version of a saturated or color shifted film which in most cases would not be approriate for accurate color reproduction. Color bars are only going to give the printer a reference point. The printer will generally not be able correct any oversaturation issues, even with color bars.
    Regards,

    Wally

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  2. #12
    David Brown's Avatar
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    I'll add a second for the tungsten film.

    My wife was in grad school a few years ago and took two advanced degrees in painting. We took a lot of slides of both her work and other students'. Experimented with everything. One can make almost anything work, but using controlled lighting reduces some of the variables.

    Whatever you use, beware of glare, shadows, and make sure everything (camera and artwork) is level and square. Crop in camera as much as possible, and mask the slides (there is tape made for just this purpose) for what can't be cropped in the 2:3 format.

    Hanging the art on a flat black background helps, too.

    Good luck.

    David

  3. #13
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    Jorde makes some excellent points.
    Steady lights make it easier to identify some problems before shooting.

    Also, give plenty of attention to balancing your illumination. Meter the center, corners, top, bottom, left, right and adjust the lights to get the readings as close as possible. I like to use a flat disk on an incident meter but a reflected meter and a grey card works just as well. Uneveness that is almost imperceptable by eye can be very noticable in the slide.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  4. #14
    Helen B's Avatar
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    'Steady lights make it easier to identify some problems before shooting.'

    I've never even considered flash...

    But what about tungsten film vs daylight film with a filter?

    Tungsten films for still cameras were usually designed for long-ish exposures without reciprocity failure. Remember the old 'Type L' Vericolor? L for long, S for short. Ektachrome 64T (EPY) needs no correction up to 10 seconds, and only a little correction between 10 and 100 seconds. EPN, on the other hand, isn't recommended for exposures longer than 1 second, and even then Kodak recommend a CC05M filter for a 1 second exposure.

    Portra 100T, which would have been worth considering if you had required prints, needs no correction up to 5 seconds - so that just goes to show that tungsten still films aren't always designed for long exposures in comparison to their daylight stablemates.

    Best,
    Helen

  5. #15
    jd callow's Avatar
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    I have struggled with copy work. In my struggles I have found 2 sets of defused tungsten lights set at an angle to each side where the spread of the light is even and the angle does not create glare in the view finder and shot with epy works very well.

    *

  6. #16
    Helen B's Avatar
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    You're not alone there.

    The Leitz (for it was Leitz in those days, not Leica as it is now) Reprovit adds two black curtains to that arrangement: each goes from a pair of lights to the lens.

    Best,
    Helen

  7. #17

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    But, if you need prints you're better off still shooting slides as each step in the developing/printing process can introduce color shift/errors depending on the lab tech.

  8. #18

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    best slide film to shoot art

    In my experience, Fuji 64T with tungsten lights is the best choice for photographing 2D artworks.
    DanG

  9. #19

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    thanks for all the resposes

    just gotta ask, why Tungstein? It seems two strobes outside the angle of reflection on either side would be a no brainer both for ease(not having to worry about shutter speed or lights on in the room reflecting) What am I missing about tungstein film?

  10. #20
    jd callow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tilt-shift
    just gotta ask, why Tungstein? It seems two strobes outside the angle of reflection on either side would be a no brainer both for ease(not having to worry about shutter speed or lights on in the room reflecting) What am I missing about tungstein film?
    For me...
    It is easier to identify problems with continuous lighting, it can allow for a greater variety of aperture settings and exposure times and finally I find EPY to be very neutral and to have a very long tonal range (more shadow and highlight detail) for slide film.

    *

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