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  1. #1

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    Another "how to create this look"-Thread :)

    Hello everybody,

    first of all i apoligize for my bad english and lack of "photographic words". I try to explain in a very subjectiv way and hope you can understand everything.

    Actually i try to develope my one photography style and want to try out two "looks":

    1.
    http://www.ostkreuz.de/feature/434?f...rapher=3&fi=20
    http://www.ostkreuz.de/feature/97?fp...rapher=3&fi=30
    (espen Eichhöfer)

    To me this style seems to have a yellow cast while the colour balance ist stil very good. In my opinion the colours also seem to be very saturated (for a colour negativ film). I almost seems to look like colour slide, but provia 400 x or colour slide with lower iso has a to "clear" look and is to sharp for this kind of style...and for a documentary work in medium format i belive both photographer would not work with 100-200 iso films...
    My first idea was to overexposure colour negative (1 1/2 - 2 stops), develope normal and then print and soft paper.
    Actually every film i tried ( Portra 400, fuji pro 400h and seems to be to soft) After scanning i try to increase the contrast, which does really look unnatural.
    At the moment i have only possibility to scan on a imacon, but i more and more belive that this and the photographer below develope and print their work in a lab.


    2.
    http://www.ostkreuz.de/feature/121?f...grapher=8&fi=9
    http://www.ostkreuz.de/feature/288?photographer=8&fi=4
    (Ute Mahler)

    I dont have really an idea how to get this style. There is a lot of deep black, while the middle-tones seem to be some kind of soft. Colour balance is not flat and this goes more in a ducumentary style with no "over-beauty skintones"




    I hope someone could help me.

    Best regards,

    Luke

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grinschus View Post
    Hello everybody,

    first of all i apoligize for my bad english and lack of "photographic words". I try to explain in a very subjectiv way and hope you can understand everything.

    Actually i try to develope my one photography style and want to try out two "looks":

    1.
    http://www.ostkreuz.de/feature/434?f...rapher=3&fi=20
    http://www.ostkreuz.de/feature/97?fp...rapher=3&fi=30
    (espen Eichhöfer)

    To me this style seems to have a yellow cast while the colour balance ist stil very good. In my opinion the colours also seem to be very saturated (for a colour negativ film). I almost seems to look like colour slide, but provia 400 x or colour slide with lower iso has a to "clear" look and is to sharp for this kind of style...and for a documentary work in medium format i belive both photographer would not work with 100-200 iso films...
    My first idea was to overexposure colour negative (1 1/2 - 2 stops), develope normal and then print and soft paper.
    Actually every film i tried ( Portra 400, fuji pro 400h and seems to be to soft) After scanning i try to increase the contrast, which does really look unnatural.
    At the moment i have only possibility to scan on a imacon, but i more and more belive that this and the photographer below develope and print their work in a lab.


    2.
    http://www.ostkreuz.de/feature/121?f...grapher=8&fi=9
    http://www.ostkreuz.de/feature/288?photographer=8&fi=4
    (Ute Mahler)

    I dont have really an idea how to get this style. There is a lot of deep black, while the middle-tones seem to be some kind of soft. Colour balance is not flat and this goes more in a ducumentary style with no "over-beauty skintones"




    I hope someone could help me.

    Best regards,

    Luke
    It's very difficult to guess but the best I could come up with is E100G (from the blues and greens) for the first and Astia (slight tendency to yellow) for the second. Colour neg is so dependent on the scanning that it's difficult to guess and I would expect you could get close to that feel with Portra to a certain extent. As for the cameras, Hasselblad or C220/C330? - I'd just get in touch with the photographers and ask.. :-)

    Tim

  3. #3

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    My first thought was also Fuji Astia, with possible white balance adjustment either in printing or Photoshop. Another possibility could be Kodak Ektar, again with the yellow/red altered in post.

    A large portion of the color also comes from the fact that these images appear to be shot in overcast conditions....

  4. #4
    tony lockerbie's Avatar
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    Can't help with the technique, but loved the images of the Gypsies.

  5. #5
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    Great images. Hard to tell what film when it's on the web. Who knows how much Photoshop was used?
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!
    For all practical purposes, they've taken Kodak away.


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  6. #6
    Brian C. Miller's Avatar
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    Why not just contact the photographer and ask?

  7. #7

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    Something people get confused about with colour is how, by simply being very selective with the frame, you can end up with surprising colour contrast in the same lighting conditions - even with Portra.

    But more importantly, you have to ask yourself whether the 'style' that you're seeing is actually the photographer's shooting aesthetic (his response to tonality, colour and lighting) or, whether there is something unique in the processing - magic bullet. In my eyes, there isn't, and what you're seeing is his own subjective and idiosyncratically personal sense of neutrality. It's very hard to imitate the way somebody else's brain processes colour! Straight photographers like this rely very much on intuition.

    The way we respond to colour at the actual shooting stage (surprising how many colour photographers don't actually see in colour) is about taste and aesthetic sensibility, but also intention with colour relationships (look up 'colour theory'). What strikes me about these pictures is the photographer's very subtle eye for colour - i.e. what is inherent in the scene. They are otherwise very, very straight and unaffected pictures. Very good too.

    The most important thing with colour is going out and developing a responsiveness and sensitivity to it, otherwise, due to its rabbit hole complexity, it can very easily become science. At which point you'll find that photography is very superficial.
    Last edited by batwister; 05-15-2013 at 12:49 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

  8. #8

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    thanks for the answers

    as i know the agency and there tradition/rules/credo: definitly no photoshop...i dont even think they use scanners and if yes, just to digitalize the final prints

    batwister :
    i absolutly agree. You could say the same for light, btw.
    Thats why i am trying to archive these kind of contrast/colour and mix it up with my personal sense of "reality". At the moment i am not satisfied with my own postproduction. I dont even know if it is the postproduction. Even when i try to avoid photoshop there still remains a basic look of film...and that is a technical point you can not avoid
    Last edited by Grinschus; 05-15-2013 at 01:50 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    It's very hard to imitate the way somebody else's brain processes colour! Straight photographers like this rely very much on intuition.
    .......

    The most important thing with colour is going out and developing a responsiveness and sensitivity to it, otherwise, due to its rabbit hole complexity, it can very easily become science. At which point you'll find that photography is very superficial.
    Excellent insight, it's something photography has in common with all visual arts. In our desire to learn the form we tend to forget that we cannot separate the art from the artist. I'm still learning, and this is so often the difficult thing, to process and absorb great work while still striving for your own style.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grinschus View Post
    At the moment i am not satisfied with my own postproduction. I dont even know if it is the postproduction. Even when i try to avoid photoshop there still remains a basic look of film...and that is a technical point you can not avoid
    What I've taken away most from the pictures - and I like them very much - is that the shooting aesthetic (his eye for tonality and colour in front of the camera) is more striking than the post processing/printing - which is very naturalistic and faithful. If you're into this kind of photography, the key is to look for colour in your subjects rather than trying to find it afterwards in the darkroom. Then your post work will be very simple.

    You might also like this photographer btw - http://www.celinette.com/ENG-index-maze.html
    Again, very naturalistic processing, but the photographer's eye for colour is bold.
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

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