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  1. #11

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    no worries as for your first question
    i am processing films for many years now but mostly B&W. colour just from time to time so I dont have a big experience in judging such cases.
    yes, it was milky and yes, bleach and fix are separated.
    i may try to run it through bleach and fix once again...but not earlier then next week

    cheers!

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by dindon View Post
    yes, it was milky
    Aha! Perfect answer. Sounds like either bleach or fix were shot or did not run to a completion. If that's the case,
    you should be able to salvage this film by running it through bleach and fix. All the luck to you!

    Cheers, Eugene.

  3. #13

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    will try it then,
    thanks!

  4. #14
    AgX
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    To explain as well the greeniish hue of the "unexposed" film as well as the partial magenta hue in that positive image only complete/partial red-light fogging comes to my mind.

  5. #15

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    Thank you AgX!
    Place where I am loading films is dark. I am using it for many years. There is however a socket on the wall with very small red light indicator. it is almost invisible and never ever affected any film. the place is pitch dark...hmm
    I also got a suggestion today to check my thermometer as it may be slightly off and all process went through wrong temperature... lots of possibilities

  6. #16
    AgX
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    The green hue can only be due to coupling of cyan-coupler (something that only could be explained by red-light exposure) or by retention of a greenish dye.
    In the latter case though that dye must have enough density to compete with the orange dye of the uncoupled couplers.

    Unexposed film (eg. edges) must either be nearly colourless (unmasked films) or have a strong orange hue (masked films). This is due to the the inherent colour of the ingredients of the base or emulsion. A fault in temperature would have no effect on this.
    Last edited by AgX; 05-16-2013 at 06:10 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17

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    ah, that's all makes more sense now. Thank you!

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