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  1. #1
    cooltouch's Avatar
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    Arista E6 kit -- wrong Blix Mix . . . help?

    Sometimes I just can't believe how stupidly dyslexic I can be. So I've got the 1st developer mixed and the color developer mixed and then I'm looking at the amount of water I need for the Blix, and it doesn't look right. It looks like too much. But I look at it again, and again, and that's what it says, so I shrug my shoulders and start to mix. Well, I've gotten the first of three Blix containers mixed with the water when I finally realize my error. I'd been looking at the water quantities needed for the Color developer, not the Blix. So, not knowing what else to do at that point, I went ahead and added the other two Blix bottles to the mix. My final quantity, which should have been 16 oz. is now 20 oz. The solution has been diluted by 25%.

    So, I'm telling myself that since it's Blix, perhaps I can just extend the time the film is immersed in the mixture to wind up with the same results. And this is what I plan to do. But I don't know for how long. I'm thinking I can just set up a basic proportion. If it's 10 minutes for a 16 oz quantity and I have 20 oz, then the basic proportion sez 10/16*20 = 12.5 minutes.

    Does this sound reasonable or am I being overly optimistic? More to the point, what would you do? Besides tossing the kit and starting over that is.

  2. #2

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    You could experiment with film shots you dont care about, but given the price of film now, I would just chalk it up as a mistake not to be repeated, and order a new kit. You are talking 70 dollars or so. Or try doubling the time in the blix. If your shots looked fine, great, better safe than sorry if not, time to call freestyle and order a new kit , but do it right and get the Tetenal kit instead. Yes , 20 bucks more for the 5 liter kit, but worth every cent and more....
    And remember, the purpose of blip (love the automatic spelling corrector in the ipad)is to remove the silver. Failure to remove it all, will cause long term damage to your film.

  3. #3

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    Everyone says blix is bad, and will eventually mean your film will go bad. If that's the case, I, like many other folk, will be regretting using it down the road. In my case I can only speak C-41 but I add extra time to the blix step from the get go. I hope that protects me a bit. If it were me I'd try a test roll and do as you suggested, add more time.
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  4. #4
    mts
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    Bleach and fix process to completion. You can run this step to process by inspection to completion. Once you see activity start then process for at least twice that time, but at minimum for the time specified with the kit. The difficulty with blix as compared with separate bleach and fix is that there is some danger of retained silver which means that the bleach and/or fix did not complete properly, and a separate issue is the lifetime of the combination which is shorter than for separate solutions. Your colors will not be affected by running the blix for a longer time, and this is probably a good idea anyway when using the solution for several films. For E-6 your clear leader should be clear at the end of the blix.
    By denying the facts, any paradox can be sustained--Galileo

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the responses, guys. I have a mixed lot of film to process, some 35mm, some 120. One of the 35mm rolls is ancient -- been in my freezer for years -- and doesn't really contain any shots that I'd regret not turning out. I could use it as the test roll, I'm thinking, but then I'm wondering if, because of its age, it might give me results that I won't be able to apply to the other rolls. Hell, none of the rolls contain anything critical, far as that goes, so I don't mind doing some testing on all of them. I'd rather play around with the kit and the film than just toss the kit and start over.

    I've heard the same thing about blix being bad, but I have some slides I developed with a kit that used blix back in the mid-80s -- about 28 years ago or so -- whose colors are as good now as they were when I first developed them. So, I personally don't assign any merit to the negative comments about blix.

  6. #6
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    I keep hearing that BLIX is bad but in some areas in this world that's all you can get without a lot of hassle. Note, that diluted BLIX (or bleach or fixer) is a lot weaker than undiluted version therefore I would at least double bleach time to be on the safe side. Since it's E6 you are trying here, any residual brown stain from incomplete bleaching should be very obvious and can be treated with another batch of correctly mixed BLIX (or bleach and fix) days or weeks later if necessary.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  7. #7
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mts View Post
    Bleach and fix process to completion. You can run this step to process by inspection to completion. Once you see activity start then process for at least twice that time, but at minimum for the time specified with the kit. The difficulty with blix as compared with separate bleach and fix is that there is some danger of retained silver which means that the bleach and/or fix did not complete properly, and a separate issue is the lifetime of the combination which is shorter than for separate solutions. Your colors will not be affected by running the blix for a longer time, and this is probably a good idea anyway when using the solution for several films. For E-6 your clear leader should be clear at the end of the blix.
    This.

    I'd just double the time and not worry about it. You can't overdo it.

    If you have lots of film to process you could also buy another kit and use some of the blix concentrates from kit 2 to mix up, say, 24 ozs total. This would require some math but would be pretty easy, but blix will spoil once mixed, unlike bleach (ok, bleach does eventually but much much slower) so I'd just give plenty of extra time and not worry about it.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    If you have lots of film to process you could also buy another kit and use some of the blix concentrates from kit 2 to mix up, say, 24 ozs total. This would require some math but would be pretty easy, but blix will spoil once mixed, unlike bleach (ok, bleach does eventually but much much slower) so I'd just give plenty of extra time and not worry about it.
    If you do get another kit and have lots of film to process, you might as well attempt two bath BLIXing, which should give you the same advantage as two bath fixing in b&w work.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.



 

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