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  1. #11
    Truzi's Avatar
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    Though I avoid walmart, they have good prices on Fuji film.

    I was probably younger than 7 when I had my first camera... the Brownie Holiday that was my mother's when she was a child. I have a lot of blurred images from not holding the camera still when pressing the button.
    No doubt you'll start your daughter with a more manageable camera, but might I suggest a 400-speed film? It will be less likely to blur her pictures if she can use faster shutter speeds. As a matter of fact, my best friend took a picture of myself standing next to Mr. Potato head at the Hasbro Headquarters in RI with my Sears KS-2 on a very sunny day, and she blurred the picture by moving the camera while pressing the button - and she was in her late twenties.
    Truzi

  2. #12

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    Thanks for the suggestions everyone. I wasn't even considering 400 speed film because I used to only ever shoot ISO 50 and 100 films! :-). Maybe for a child it is worth the grain and color penalty. A couple questions this brings up:
    Since they apparently no longer sell Gold 100 or Superia Reala (what a shame!), is the grain penalty going from ISO 200 to 400 not that large anymore?
    Would anyone here say the Kodak Gold 400 is worth 30 cents a roll more than the Fuji Superia 400? I remember 10 years ago I certainly liked the Kodak colors better, but I have shot mostly slides since then. Definitely not starting her out on those! ;-)
    Although with them being printed on Fuji Crystal Archive and developed most likely in Fuji chemicals at Costco, would the Kodak Gold 400 even show any difference? Maybe the other steps in the process render it a moot point, I don't know.

  3. #13

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    I was going to suggest real B&W film instead, then you can teach her to develop at home too and see the results as it hangs to dry, she might like that, and B&W neg's are much nicer to look at than color ones. Plus B&W has more latitude for error, AND if she gets a lot of "dull" color from the cheaper film, she might loose interest, but B&W is almost always more interesting with the contrast of tones IMHO... just a thought.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jedidiah Smith View Post
    Thanks for the suggestions everyone. I wasn't even considering 400 speed film because I used to only ever shoot ISO 50 and 100 films! :-). Maybe for a child it is worth the grain and color penalty. A couple questions this brings up:
    Since they apparently no longer sell Gold 100 or Superia Reala (what a shame!), is the grain penalty going from ISO 200 to 400 not that large anymore?
    Would anyone here say the Kodak Gold 400 is worth 30 cents a roll more than the Fuji Superia 400? I remember 10 years ago I certainly liked the Kodak colors better, but I have shot mostly slides since then. Definitely not starting her out on those! ;-)
    Although with them being printed on Fuji Crystal Archive and developed most likely in Fuji chemicals at Costco, would the Kodak Gold 400 even show any difference? Maybe the other steps in the process render it a moot point, I don't know.
    IMO, both Sureria and Gold, 400 speed films are really sweet.

    As to the difference in colors between Sureria and Gold, is nothing to right home about. Yes, there are differences, but in metaphor it's like choosing between two different good friends to spend an afternoon with.

    Another thing about C41 films, unlike traditional B&W, is that extra exposure actually reduces grain and avoids most color issues. I'll happily shoot 400 rated C41 films at EI's as low as 25 or even 12 in a pinch. At the underexposure end of the scale, I'm much more careful. 1-stop under is typically workable when needed.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #15
    bvy
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    If this is for the purposes of teaching photography to and spending time with your young daughter, then I think you're splitting hairs worrying about the differences between Fujifilm and Kodak consumer films. Both are capable and respectable products. As far as grain from 400 speed film, it's a non-issue as long as you're shooting in good light, and exposing and processing normally. I printed a frame from a roll of (fresh) Superia 1600 recently, and honestly can't see any telltale signs of high speed film (image called "Ken" in my gallery). Put your energies into teaching her composition and the fundamentals. Enjoy yourselves...

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by bvy View Post
    If this is for the purposes of teaching photography to and spending time with your young daughter, then I think you're splitting hairs worrying about the differences between Fujifilm and Kodak consumer films. Both are capable and respectable products. As far as grain from 400 speed film, it's a non-issue as long as you're shooting in good light, and exposing and processing normally. I printed a frame from a roll of (fresh) Superia 1600 recently, and honestly can't see any telltale signs of high speed film (image called "Ken" in my gallery). Put your energies into teaching her composition and the fundamentals. Enjoy yourselves...
    Absolutely. Too much detail to worry about with a young child. Make shooting film FUN first.

  7. #17

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    A few thoughts - I have a daughter who started photography at about that age, and it was a great opportunity for us to bond, and to share something - I support the endeavor regardless.

    Regarding film, StoneNYC suggests B&W - which is what my daughter started on. You can process film at home and it is very low cost - you also get to see exactly what you get - with colour print film, many issues with exposure are masked by the printing, so it is less good as a learning experience.

    Another way to go would be to go to a colour transparency film where the exposure latitude is even less. If she can develop the skill to get well exposed slides, then B&W, or colour print films will be easy.

    Bottom line though, is that she can learn on any film, and any film can help you to grow closer - don't let the film get in the way of creating memories.

    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I was going to suggest real B&W film instead, then you can teach her to develop at home too and see the results as it hangs to dry, she might like that, and B&W neg's are much nicer to look at than color ones. Plus B&W has more latitude for error, AND if she gets a lot of "dull" color from the cheaper film, she might loose interest, but B&W is almost always more interesting with the contrast of tones IMHO... just a thought.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Christian View Post
    The Fuji film from Walmart is the aforementioned Fuji Superia. Great stuff for the price.
    Tis is the same as the Walgreens house brand.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  9. #19

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    I've been seeing Kodak Gold 200 on Ebay lately for about $2 a roll. As Lucky Color Film fades into history Gold seems to be picking up the slack for cheap color film.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by madgardener View Post
    I've been seeing Kodak Gold 200 on Ebay lately for about $2 a roll. As Lucky Color Film fades into history Gold seems to be picking up the slack for cheap color film.
    B & H has Superia 400 for $1.79 a roll.

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