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  1. #1

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    Unicolor c41 color cast problem.

    Hi all,

    Just developed my first roll Kodak pro 160 , 6X6 format using Unicolor C41 kit.
    I follow instruction carefully. Scan using Epson V600 and vuescan.
    seems something wrong, any one help me please?

    Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2

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    Looks fine to me. Getting colours right from colour neg scans can be quite hard. Try opening the tiff in Photoshop and play with Curves to see if you can get a result you're happy with.

  3. #3

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    Hi eriklovold ,

    thanks for reply. I'm using vuescan for years, I scanned a roll of commercial developed film yesterday, with good result. Anyway, thanks for your idea, and I will try to edit tiff file and see if I can correct the color fading problem.

    here's the commercial developed film , and I scan it with epson V600.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Regards,
    Ew

  4. #4

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    hi,

    color corrected in photoshop. looks much better now. thanks !

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  5. #5
    Rudeofus's Avatar
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    Color negative film can register much higher contrast than a JPG file or photographic paper. When you scan negative film, and especially with motives that have a high scene brightness ratio, the scanner post processing software will compress contrast to make it fit into 8 bit color space. As a result, the image will look faded and contrastless, just as if you print a b&w neg on gradation 0 paper. Get the negs printed optically and you'll see that colors are most likely fine and dandy. If you insist on hybrid work flow, plan for digital post processing on your computer.

    PS: I realize that this topic reaches deeply into DPUG area. Reason I think it should still be discussed here on APUG is because many people judge color negatives based on poor and unprocessed scans and reach very wrong conclusions about the film material and its development.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  6. #6

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    I'd be interested in seeing a manually corrected wet print from that negative for comparison.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clovis Blevins View Post
    I'd be interested in seeing a manually corrected wet print from that negative for comparison.
    "manually corrected" tends to imply that the neg is "wrong" which I suspect it isn't and therein lies the problem with terminology when scanning is involved and confusion arises.

    I'd like to see a wet print with the correct colour filtration applied in the enlarger. I see no reason why it shouldn't match the scan-corrected image.

    pentaxuser

  8. #8

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    In our local area , only one shop can process c41 , but then films that processed by them looks dirty and scratches sometime. otherwise films that developed by them can be really easy to scan with correct color reproduction.
    I purchased Unicolor c41 kit recently, just because I want to get rid of scratches and dirty film from local shop.
    No manual enlarge service in our country now, they will just scan it either Noritsu or Fuji Frontier scanner and print it .
    I used Acer scanwit 2740 for years, ( with vuescan software ) and bought Epson V600 recently, for medium format scan.

    Can't afford to invest RA4 print equipments yet.

  9. #9

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    With home developed C-41 I find I am happier with an extra 15 seconds in the color developer.
    - Bill Lynch

  10. #10
    polyglot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wblynch View Post
    With home developed C-41 I find I am happier with an extra 15 seconds in the color developer.
    That may make it very difficult to make wet prints, should you ever wish to do so. Current papers are all high-contrast and you're effectively pushing your film half a stop.

    For portraits I know I'm going to wet-print, I often find a 1-stop pull valuable.

    ewsphoto: have a read of the C41-scan link in my FAQ; it may help you with colour correction in scanning. I wouldn't assume that your chemical process is wrong just yet.

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