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  1. #1

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    Anyone know where to develop old 616 Superchrome Gevaert film?

    where can I develop 616 film?

  2. #2

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    "Panic not my child, the Great Yellow Father has your hand"--Larry Dressler

  3. #3
    Brac's Avatar
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    You've posted this in the colour section, but I think you will probably find that it is a black & white film, possibly even an ortho one. Chrome or chrom as part of a film name often indicated it was a black & white film in the 1950's/60's and earlier eg Kodak Verichrome, Ilford Selochrome, Agfa Isochrom etc etc.

  4. #4

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    Definely a B&W films, probably from the 1950's. There is some very useful info at this link for the specific film (courtesy of 30 seconds on Google!):


    http://www.amateurphotographer.co.uk...y-50-years-old

  5. #5
    AgX
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    Yes, it is a b&w film. From the 40's
    20 ASA and ortho-panchromatic

    The spelling is Superchrom.

  6. #6
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    It's not an Ortho film, the word Chrome was added to show it had a wider Chromatic response, still not fully panchchromatic though.

    Verichrome dates back to around 1908/9 when it was released by Wratten & Wainwright, and the term was in constant use for B&W films until the demise of Kodak Verichrome PAn.

    I'd sugeest see-sawing it in a tray with D&^/ID-11, it's an easy technique when you don't have a tank that takes the film size.

    Ian



 

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