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  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10speeduk View Post
    Hi Trask, these were all shot with 5 mins of each other. The light appeared consistent at the time....!?
    The problem shots are slightly backlit, but mainly lit by what appears to be open sky.

    The better shot appears to be lighted by diffused sunlight from the front.

    Those two light sources have really different character and colour.

    That being said, I would think that there may be some scanning issues involved as well.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    The problem shots are slightly backlit, but mainly lit by what appears to be open sky.

    The better shot appears to be lighted by diffused sunlight from the front.

    Those two light sources have really different character and colour.

    That being said, I would think that there may be some scanning issues involved as well.
    Hi Matt, these were all scanned at the same time on the same strip! literally at the same time, open lid put in film and scan. open lid remove film. Anyway, not to worry, I have been doing some meter tests Vs my D700 and Minolta IV. It appears that centre weighting is pretty accurate, in fact more accurate than the D700! Plus my manual lens has a CPU chip so I can also use Matrix metering if I want. So no need for me to worry. I will run a few more rolls with these settings before I decide. Thanks Paul
    Speed Graphic, Fuji GX680,Pentax 67, Mamiya RZ67, Mamiya 645 1000s, Nikon F5, Nikon Fm2

  3. #13
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Paul:

    Most scanners love to try to "improve" things by having the software automatically adjust each individual scan. So what you are seeing could very well reflect at least partially those automatic adjustments.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #14
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    Sorry Paul I don't have a scanner, but I have been shooting portraits with it for as long as it has been available in both 35mm and 120 and had good results with this method. Forget about the zone System and use incidental metering.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 07-03-2013 at 08:14 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  5. #15

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    Like others, use incandescent meter to get correct exposure, forget about zone system for colour. Pro 400H looks great when it's shot at ISO 200.

    Learn about white balance. Your D700 most likely tries to guess it automatically. Set your D700 to daylight balance and shoot it in shadow and it will look the same. It's not magic.
    If you would give this film to get printed, the white balance would get corrected automatically. Since you are doing the scanning, you have to correct it as well.
    This photos might be shot at the same time, but it's clearly obvious that the light sources are different. One is sun and the other is shadow.

  6. #16
    DanielStone's Avatar
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    just use an incident meter.

    I've found that 400H goes BLUE if it's shot @ box speed. This is with both DIY c-41(with Trebla/CPAC chemicals, the same as Kodak quality-wise IME) AND pro-lab development(again, in both Kodak AND Fuji chemistry). I try and do my own c-41 now, not just to save costs, but also because I control each step, so I know that my "normal" is actually a slight push(3:30 vs 3:15(c-41's "normal" time), just a tad higher contrast)

    Rating it @ 200(so a 1 stop overexposure) gave me more warmth, not just more density. I found it was easier to scan(and optically print) than those shots made @ ISO 400.
    *ALL METER READINGS WERE DONE VIA INCIDENT METHOD*

    In all honesty, if you really want those "pastel" colors, rate the film @ ISO 80-100. It'll wash the colors out more, and the grain will be less pronounced. At least in my experience.

    here's what I've found I get my color to look SIMILAR(not exactly) when rating it @ iso 125(my personal favorite when using 400H):
    http://josevillablog.com/2011/07/havana-cuba/

    -Dan

  7. #17
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    I've found Pro400h to be spot-on on box speed. I spotmeter my subjects so I can't be that much off. However I've found it's prone not to be so forgiving on overexposures as most color negatives are. For underexposing is more forgiving. Meaning you can burn out some highlights when you shoot at some ASA100 or so, but this can also depend how you develop it.

    It's a lot due to scanning and inverting technique used on the particualr C41 scan. If you don't know how to properly scan C41 negative then the results are almost always dissapointing, whether exposure- and colour-wise, or both, IMHO at least.

    Pro400h is my overall favourite C41 film and I always shoot it right at the box speed, couple of my drumscans for "box-speed" (ASA400) proof:



    David+Sandra by tsiklonaut, on Flickr





    Gamelan man by tsiklonaut, on Flickr

  8. #18

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    Are you using the ColorPerfect system for your C-41 negatives?

    http://www.c-f-systems.com/Plug-ins.html

    Tom

  9. #19
    tsiklonaut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kershaw View Post
    Are you using the ColorPerfect system for your C-41 negatives?

    http://www.c-f-systems.com/Plug-ins.html

    Tom
    Hi Tom,

    No actually, I use my own developed recipe that's almost fully done using curves in 16-bit- and in large color-space mode. No plugins required with my method, just knowing your color space and using simple adjustments.

    Margus

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by tsiklonaut View Post
    Hi Tom,

    No actually, I use my own developed recipe that's almost fully done using curves in 16-bit- and in large color-space mode.

    Margus
    That is an interesting approach; I assume you are using a standardised approach, e.g. a saved set of curves?

    Tom

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