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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by tsiklonaut View Post
    Hi Tom,

    No actually, I use my own developed recipe that's almost fully done using curves in 16-bit- and in large color-space mode.

    Margus
    That is an interesting approach; I assume you are using a standardised approach, e.g. a saved set of curves?

    Tom

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by 10speeduk View Post
    Hi Trask, these were all shot with 5 mins of each other. The light appeared consistent at the time....!?
    Not to my eyes. There is clearly some sunshine in the bottom shot of the lady by a iron gate judging by the shadow of the bars on her skin. The top two seemed to have been shot in very overcast conditions and have a blue look. especially the first one. Not saying this is any part of the solution to the problem but clearly the light conditions seem different despite there being only 5 mins between the shots.

    pentaxuser

  3. #23
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    Who particularly knows why the cast is present on the 1st two shots, but seeing as you have an almost perfect white reference in the last shot (dress), you might as well use this as your base to correct the others, if desired.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  4. #24

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    Light can change in 1 second or not for hours. Just because you shot them within 5 minutes means nothing. Our eyes adjust in a more subtle way than lenses/film and we don't always notice. Get a hand meter. I also have struggled with 400H. It takes a while to learn a film. Just keep practicing and understand that you won't always get the shot. I have shot color rolls (c41) where 1 shot out of 36 was good. And I have never, ever, shot a perfect roll.

  5. #25

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    Wow. Thanks for all the feedback. I will shoot a couple of rolls today. I will incident meter for both and shoot 1 at box and one at asa200. Cheers Paul
    Speed Graphic, Pentax 67, Mamiya RZ67, Mamiya 645 1000s, Nikon F5, Nikon Fm2

  6. #26
    tsiklonaut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kershaw View Post
    That is an interesting approach; I assume you are using a standardised approach, e.g. a saved set of curves?
    Curves settings can be saved, but you can only do it with headroom ("reserves") if you want tempalates. Using those ready-presets you still need to fine-tune with new set of curves since each frame is slightly different from another. So I prefer to do it manually for each frame since it only takes sconds for me using my own guidelines.



    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    Who particularly knows why the cast is present on the 1st two shots, but seeing as you have an almost perfect white reference in the last shot (dress), you might as well use this as your base to correct the others, if desired.
    It's about scanning and then inverting technique IMO. Lot of people think they can get all the magic out of scanner's software inversion but in most cases you don't, very-very few high-end scanning softwares offer you decent enough negative inversion. There's actually very simple principle to get decent negatives with an utter consistency from most scanners - scan them as 16bit positives and flat (but with one important sidenote: scanner must have a good stock white-balance for flat setting - i.e. IT8 calibrated on CCD or white-calibrated on PMT drumscanner).

    And invert them in PP with smartly adjusted curves. This is something you must discover and master yourself since everybody can have his/her own taste or interpretation here. That's why I love the C41 since it gives you more playground with the colors and tonality

    During the inversion with smartly adjusted curves you already set the gray into robust balance since you roughly sync the channel shapes. Then fine-tune later to have it spot-on. In fact it's so simple mostly you do not need to find black/gray/white spots on the image. You do it with inspecting the curve levels on each channel and reconfirm with your own eyes since your basis is right and when you're off it'll be painfully obvious. Works on all negatives - Kodak, Fuji etc. The first (inverting-) curves is the most important and even with very difficult white-balance frames I get decent results with my simple recipe. Here's coppermine shot through brownish haze w/o any usable gray spot but still came out usable after inversion into positive:


    Cheers,
    Margus
    Last edited by tsiklonaut; 07-08-2013 at 02:55 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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