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  1. #1
    destroya's Avatar
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    is there any difference between 35mm and 120 films that a 120 nuB user should know?

    I know they are different sizes

    i just brought home my new to me pentax 67. i bought 4 rolls at the store to try out to make sure the camera is working ok before the 14 day return policy expires. i bought film ive used in 35mm before and want to know if there is anything different, mainly regarding exposure, that i should take in to account. i bought 1 roll each of xp4, acros 100, provia 100 and velvia 50.

    im looking forward to shooting and especially at viewing the huge negatives on the light table. loading the camera, not so much as i've read the pentax can take a while to get comfortable with for new users/loaders.

  2. #2

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    The thickness of the base is usually different with the 120 film having a thinner base. Since 120 film is not subject to light piping the base of BW film is not usually colored.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #3
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by destroya View Post
    I know they are different sizes

    i just brought home my new to me pentax 67. i bought 4 rolls at the store to try out to make sure the camera is working ok before the 14 day return policy expires. i bought film ive used in 35mm before and want to know if there is anything different, mainly regarding exposure, that i should take in to account. i bought 1 roll each of xp4, acros 100, provia 100 and velvia 50.

    im looking forward to shooting and especially at viewing the huge negatives on the light table. loading the camera, not so much as i've read the pentax can take a while to get comfortable with for new users/loaders.

    There are some differences, but they are subtle, so you need not worry about them for your trial films.

    You will most likely encounter the differences if you decide to fine tune your exposure and development choices, and mostly they relate to factors like adjusting contrast and exposure to take into account that you need to enlarge less for a given print size. Some people end up using slightly different EIs for their medium format work, but again that is as a result of fine tuning their entire workflow.

    The Pentax 67 lenses may exhibit different contrast than your lenses for 35mm, so in the long run you may end up taking that into account as well.

    As I said, the differences will be subtle, so don't worry about them yet.

    Have fun!
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #4
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    The Pentax 67 exposes well, unfiltered, with its TTL finder. However, using a polariser and relying on TTL exposure is fraught with error. It is best to separately meter polarised shots (including the +1.5 to +2.0 compensation factor at meter). The 67 is a half-stop camera with a five-stop exposure zone in the balance-needle system, that is to say, from the mid-line mark, above has +2.5 stops, below is –2.5 stops, so only a slight under or over placement of the needle will be sufficient for a half-stop change in exposure — very noticeable with Velvia and Provia, no big deal with negs. Go to 1 stop over or under and things will be pear-shaped with Vaudeville Velvia. I suggest that you run through a roll of Velvia and expose it at all apertures and shutter speeds and scrutinise the results. No need to use a polariser for this; it's just to check exposure is accurate. With advanced age, the 6x7 / 67 bodies do lose their shutter speed accuracy to the rudimentary nature of the electronics.

    The modern-era SMC Pentax 67 lenses, though still pricey, are very highly regarded: contrasty, very sharp and easy to use. Take the time to focus critically, but if you are using one of the Pentax ultrawides e.g. 45mm, hyperfocusing is fine. Observe correct prism/lens removal protocol to prevent stress and/or fracturing the aperture coupling chain; that is to say:

    Mount and dismount lenses normally without trouble.
    However, when refitting the prism (for whatever reason you took it off): remove the lens, remount the prism and then remount the lens.

    67 negs/trannies are a juicy 400% bigger than 35mm, so the visual impact and detail-rich presentation will certainly give you something to crow about. But the real icing on the cake is getting huge prints done, far and beyond what is capable of 35mm with its attendant fall-off the larger the print size. I reckon you'll have a lot of fun and be really, really satisfied with the results.
    Last edited by Poisson Du Jour; 07-09-2013 at 02:03 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    One beautiful image is worth
    a thousand hours of therapy.


    "It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government
    to save the environment."
    .::Ansel Adams






  5. #5

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    For me the difference is in the prints. You can have bigger prints from the 6x7.

    Jeff

  6. #6
    clayne's Avatar
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    He means the film itself. Other than a different base in some cases, the pragmatic answer is: not really.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  7. #7
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    With regard to exposure no difference.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  8. #8

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    The film itself will behave the same. Use lens shades as needed. The biggest problem will be getting used to the personality of the prism meter,
    if you decide to use that. I always prefer to use a handheld spotmeter for all my different cameras, so this is a non-issue for me. Or you could
    just take along your 35mm camera to meter thru that until you get accustomed to the Pentax. But otherwise, it's a fairly easy camera to learn
    to use.

  9. #9

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    From K&S? Saw them in the store and if I didn't already have 6x6 and 6x9 MF I would have bought one. They looked to be in great shape.

    Quote Originally Posted by destroya View Post
    I know they are different sizes

    i just brought home my new to me pentax 67. i bought 4 rolls at the store to try out to make sure the camera is working ok before the 14 day return policy expires. i bought film ive used in 35mm before and want to know if there is anything different, mainly regarding exposure, that i should take in to account. i bought 1 roll each of xp4, acros 100, provia 100 and velvia 50.

    im looking forward to shooting and especially at viewing the huge negatives on the light table. loading the camera, not so much as i've read the pentax can take a while to get comfortable with for new users/loaders.

  10. #10
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    The film itself will behave the same. Use lens shades as needed. The biggest problem will be getting used to the personality of the prism meter,
    if you decide to use that. I always prefer to use a handheld spotmeter for all my different cameras, so this is a non-issue for me. Or you could
    just take along your 35mm camera to meter thru that until you get accustomed to the Pentax. But otherwise, it's a fairly easy camera to learn
    to use.
    This is good advice, especially relating to the use of a spot meter to nail exposures. It does require experimenting for a while so you can find your happy medium for 'just right' exposure in many varied (and sometimes difficult) circumstances. Nothing is really beyond the scope of using a spot meter to sort out difficult lighting.

    I agree with the reference to the personality of the prism meter; it is an oddball thing, but efficient and effective at what it does — to a point!
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    One beautiful image is worth
    a thousand hours of therapy.


    "It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government
    to save the environment."
    .::Ansel Adams






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