Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,957   Posts: 1,558,060   Online: 1090
      
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Floriduh
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,272
    Images
    2

    The Lifespan of E6 Film?

    There may be alot of us with 35mm rolls of E6 in our freezers. I've bought or traded film and now have a bag full of E6 in the freezer such as Provia, Velvia, Sensia, E200. Some of it is probably 5 years old up to 10/12 living in a standard refrigerator freezer. What's your info on any problems to be encountered.
    W.A. Crider

  2. #2
    wildbill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Grand Rapids
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,454
    Images
    140
    I just finished a box of velvia that expired in 93. Since the film came out in 1990, it's about as old as you're going to find. No issues as long as it's always stored properly. I have seen color shifts in some old kodak stock but none in E64 which I shot 3 years ago and had expired in the late 80's.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  3. #3
    Muihlinn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Olías del Rey, Toledo
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    287
    if it was properly stored it will be fine, I have been shooting old stuff for a while and 95% or more came up perfectly.
    Luis Miguel Castañeda Navas
    http://imaginarymagnitude.net/

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Near Tavistock, Devon, on the edge of Dartmoor.
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,038
    It willbe no good whatsoever. Post it to me and I'll dispose of it for you.
    (Somehow I think that's been said before!)
    Steve

  5. #5
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Vic., Australia.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,632
    Images
    15
    One problem with long term storage of around 5 years in the freezer is embrittlement and sticking of the emulsion — the film may actually tear/snap unexpectedly. It needs as a minimum 24 hours to thaw out. If you have a camera that is manually wound on, load a roll in that and expose every frame with the lens cap on, then rewind it. This will demonstrate whether the film jams or winds on without any problem. In a camera with a motor drive the speed of the drive is what has been known to fracture the emulsion. I have experienced this with films stored for 6 years in deep freeze (Velvia 50 and also E100VS).

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Washington, D.C.
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    131
    I shot a 100 ft roll of Velvia RVP from 2002 and it was perfect. Bought it from an auction on the big site.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin