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  1. #1

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    Fuji Velvia users: which is your preferred flavor and why?

    For those of you who have tried both, which one is your preferred one and why?
    I'm a E100VS fan, but the stuff is running out
    The original RVP was what I saw my dad using when he shot flowers and cityscapes, but I'm curious what 100 has to offer and how it compares to the current RVP 50

  2. #2

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    There should be a few threads about the differences between the Velvias (including the now-discontinued-but-still-available-in-places Velvia 100F) in the archives. In short, I greatly prefer Velvia 50, which has essentially the same characteristics as the original Velvia introduced in 1990 and discontinued in 2005. Velvia 100 has higher contrast and a different palette that gives you bluer greens, redder reds, and weaker yellows. It has its appeal, but I got sick of it quickly (mainly because of the contrast - it loses detail in highlights and shadows quicker than 50) and now use 100 mainly for long night exposures (much better reciprocity characteristics than 50) and situations where I really need more speed and won't mind the colors. Of course you should do your own comparisons, but as far as my preference: on a recent trip to the southwestern USA I used 39 rolls of V50 and 1 of V100 - and that one mainly because it was about to expire!

  3. #3

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    I used Velvia 50 and 100 on the same trip to Hawai'i, I can't tell the difference. Maybe if I shot the exact same subject at the same time, with the same exposure, I'd be able to, but to me, they look exactly the same.

  4. #4
    Klainmeister's Avatar
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    The first 100 I shot, I thought looked significantly different, but between the 50 and 100, I can't tell them apart in my slide book much. That, and since Ciba is dead and it's left to scanning, most minor color differences are moot against proper calibration of workflow.
    K.S. Klain

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by GarageBoy View Post
    For those of you who have tried both, which one is your preferred one and why?
    I'm a E100VS fan, but the stuff is running out
    The original RVP was what I saw my dad using when he shot flowers and cityscapes, but I'm curious what 100 has to offer and how it compares to the current RVP 50
    The three velvia's are very different. You can take a look at these for examples..

    http://www.onlandscape.co.uk/2010/12...lm-comparison/
    http://www.onlandscape.co.uk/2011/02...arison-pt-two/
    http://www.onlandscape.co.uk/2011/06...mparison-pt-3/

    In short Velvia 100 is known as 'redvia' to many - it pumps a load of red in many situations and kills greens
    Velvia 50 is the best by far in my opinion but does go a bit berserk pointed at the sun. It is particularly good at greenery or many sorts and is quite neutral (contrary to popular belief). It moves yellows towards orange and greens toward blue
    Velvia 100F is probably the most 'neutral' but hates being overexposed. Skies can go a little weird with Velvia 100F.

    Many US photographers like Velvia 100F for desert work I believe - I don't know much about that though..

    I'd stick with Velvia 50 for most stuff but it's been discontinued apart from the Japanese market.

    You'll probably get on with Velvia 100 but you could try Provia - it's a funny film, good in many situations but goes a bit 'cyany'.

    Tim

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by timparkin View Post
    I'd stick with Velvia 50 for most stuff but it's been discontinued apart from the Japanese market.
    You're referring to sheet formats, right? AKAIK Velvia 50 is still in production and available in 135 and 120 globally.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Schoof View Post
    You're referring to sheet formats, right? AKAIK Velvia 50 is still in production and available in 135 and 120 globally.
    Sorry I thought I was on the LF forum for a sec :-)

    Tim

  8. #8
    destroya's Avatar
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    i prefer 50, but i do use 100f if i need more light. i actually prefer fortia, but i guess thats not really a velvia

  9. #9
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    E100VS is just bloody awful. One framed Ilfochrome print on that stuff iin 2004 was enough to send me packing back to Velvia, which back then (2004) was in some sort of supply shortage.

    RVP 50: enhanced primaries, with a 'heavy-hitting' green channel. Neutral whites. Highlights blow gracefully but shadows will block easily. Despite populist opinion, this film is not over-saturated. Spot meter it for the best results.

    RVP 100: almost electric in its palette, but the stand-out feature is the very pure whites. Essentially the same as RVP 50 with a speed boost.

    RVP 100F: a silly pot-pourri of yellow mustards, bland greens, muggy browns and insipid reds that clash and clang and jar, particularly on Ilfochrome. No great mystery why it's on the way out. Provia 100F is Velvia with a subdued palette and better shadow/highlight tolerance. Much better skin tones than both RVPs. All of my RVP imaging is spot metered, with full polarisation. It remains the gold standard among analogue professionals involved in printing for gallery exhibition. In MF and LF, it is an easier film to work with by dint of separate, disciminate metering. In 35mm, a lot of contrast and tone is packed into a small size which is not always well managed by on-board meters. It's best to experiment with this film so you can make an informed and careful judgement about the film's response to many situations from flat, foggy illumination to marginal emergent point light, because it will require fine tweaking of metering to balance everything, very especially so if the result is destined for printing. EI40 for 35mm is common, ISO 50 is a judgement call. In MF/LF/ULF, ISO 50 to EI64 are fine.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    E100VS is just bloody awful. One framed Ilfochrome print on that stuff iin 2004 was enough to send me packing back to Velvia, which back then (2004) was in some sort of supply shortage.

    RVP 50: enhanced primaries, with a 'heavy-hitting' green channel. Neutral whites. Highlights blow gracefully but shadows will block easily. Despite populist opinion, this film is not over-saturated. Spot meter it for the best results.

    RVP 100: almost electric in its palette, but the stand-out feature is the very pure whites. Essentially the same as RVP 50 with a speed boost.

    RVP 100F: a silly pot-pourri of yellow mustards, bland greens, muggy browns and insipid reds that clash and clang and jar, particularly on Ilfochrome. No great mystery why it's on the way out. Provia 100F is Velvia with a subdued palette and better shadow/highlight tolerance. Much better skin tones than both RVPs. All of my RVP imaging is spot metered, with full polarisation. It remains the gold standard among analogue professionals involved in printing for gallery exhibition. In MF and LF, it is an easier film to work with by dint of separate, disciminate metering. In 35mm, a lot of contrast and tone is packed into a small size which is not always well managed by on-board meters. It's best to experiment with this film so you can make an informed and careful judgement about the film's response to many situations from flat, foggy illumination to marginal emergent point light, because it will require fine tweaking of metering to balance everything, very especially so if the result is destined for printing. EI40 for 35mm is common, ISO 50 is a judgement call. In MF/LF/ULF, ISO 50 to EI64 are fine.
    You rate provia100f at EI64? Did I get that right?


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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