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Thread: Mounting Slides

  1. #21
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edp View Post
    Something like this is a useful tool. Widely available, I got mine off ebay more than likely.

    http://www.berezin.com/3d/images/cuttermedium.jpg
    +1!

    They work great for cutting negatives as well.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #22
    KennyMark's Avatar
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    I have an automated mounter for hinged plastic mounts that I got from a lab several years ago with some other things. I've never used it, but perhaps I should blow the dust off it and give it a try. Perhaps I could mount rolls for people here that need it.

    Something else to do this weekend.
    If you call it a "prime lens" because it's a fixed-focal length (i.e. not a zoom lens), then as Inigo Montoya said so eloquently, "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."

  3. #23
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    So what use are they, then? For scanning I'd just use the same film holders as for negatives.
    They are used for storage in slide file sheets either in book form or hanging files in a filing cabinet so you can view a whole page of slides on a light box.
    Glass mounts are expensive and are usually only used for actual projection.
    Ben

  4. #24
    destroya's Avatar
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    I put my negs/slides in print file sleeves. Broke out the projector last week for the first time in a long time. mounted the best ones and then projected them.

    NOW, I have to put them back. I'm not really looking forward to un-mounting them, figuring out which slide goes in which sleeve (forgot to take notes) and then putting the gebe mounts back in the box in an organized fashion. I guess i could get some print files sleeves for mounted slides, but that's just another binder in the ever growing film shelf.

  5. #25
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    When I worked in a photographic store years ago and customers brought E6 films in for processing one of my staff used to ask them "do you want them mounted, unmounted, or just holding hands " ?
    Ben

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    Glass mounts are expensive and are usually only used for actual projection.
    Storing slides in glass mounts will likely generate mold on the film after a time, due to inadequate air circulation. I lost a bunch that way after black spots starting showing up on the films and could not be removed. So I still file 35mm & 6x6 slides in cardboard mounts in slide filing boxes for projection. It keeps them separated for air, and they're still in good shape. I have not sold my two Ektagraphic auto-focus projectors w/ matching zoom lenses, or the 70x70-inch lenticular screen, or the professional lap dissolve unit that I used for sound accompaniment. And, yep, they'll likely never be seen again, except for my own nostalgic viewing.
    Last edited by silveror0; 08-24-2013 at 03:36 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #27
    Marvin's Avatar
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    Back when I did E6 myself I used the heat seal mounts for 35mm but hard to get them back out of the mount. The last ones that I processed just stored in Print file pages. I can put a strip of six in my Minolta film scanner and makes for easy scanning.
    Marvin

  8. #28
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    I have a question her for folks as I have NO experience at all in this matter. I have shot some slide film, both 135 and 120 (6 x 4.5) and the lab has returned the transparencies to me uncut and unmounted. How hard and time consuming is it to mount slides? How long to mount 36 exposures? How do you cut them? Are they permanently mounted (glued?) or can you remove them if need be.

    I am thinking of shooting a lot of slide film but fear that mounting them will be an enormous task.

    Thank you!

    It is costly and time-consuming for labs nowadays to cut and mount slides. Full strips is the standard througput unless you are prepared to pay for mounting.
    Mounting slides the old way, in traditional slide mounts, is wasteful and counterproductive if you don't intend to project them at all frequently. Strips of 35mm and 120 can be cut and placed in archival sleeves then a storage box, ready to be whipped out for viewing on the lightbox or, of scanning/printing. If you're really keen, eBay has occasional listings of Gepe glass slide mounts, but 120 might be much harder to find. These mounts are somewhat frail and they do break easily. Fungus and mould love these things for the cosy access and favourable conditions to proliferate: I've not been a fan of any slide mounts since my Kodachrome days 22 years ago. You might want to have a look around for archival plastic or card masks upon which individual frames are taped into position — especially useful for bureaux printing where many people will be handling the slide with no risk of breakage or other damage. In the end, it's what you intend to do with the slides that will determine how you store them, and there are many better ways than slapping them into arcane mounts.

    I have a cutter box for slicing rolls to fit sleeves, and use Fiskar shears to cut individual frames prior to mounting in masks. Oh, and a scalpel is handy too...

    • Example of archival sleeves for bureaux scan/print jobbing

    Click image for larger version. 

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    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






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