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  1. #11
    bvy
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    The newer Holgas have a working aperture selection switch -- cloudy is f16 and sunny is f22 (rounding up to the nearest whole stop). The older ones are fixed at around f16. The shutter is pretty consistent between models -- around 1/100. So "Sunny 16" with 400 speed film suggests that shooting at f22 in bright sunlight will overexpose the film by one stop. f16, by two stops. As such, I think it would be okay to develop normally. If you shot in any other light, you might ask the lab to push it by one stop. But given the parameters here, that might be splitting hairs.

  2. #12
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvy View Post
    The newer Holgas have a working aperture selection switch -- cloudy is f16 and sunny is f22 (rounding up to the nearest whole stop). The older ones are fixed at around f16. The shutter is pretty consistent between models -- around 1/100. So "Sunny 16" with 400 speed film suggests that shooting at f22 in bright sunlight will overexpose the film by one stop. f16, by two stops. As such, I think it would be okay to develop normally. If you shot in any other light, you might ask the lab to push it by one stop. But given the parameters here, that might be splitting hairs.
    I thought the Holga apertures were f/11 and f/16.

    To the OP: overexposing C41 Portra is not harmful. Many photographers expose the film one full stop over the ISO speed, just as a general rule of thumb, and overexposure certainly is not where Portra has limitations. You can shoot Portra 400 at 100 or 50 and still have usable negatives. It is incredibly tolerant to overexposure. What it doesn't like is underexposure.
    Put a roll in your Holga, shoot away, process normal, and see what results. If you find that the negatives are very thin, you will want to explore push processing, asking your lab to process the film longer.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

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  3. #13
    wildbill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvy View Post
    The newer Holgas have a working aperture selection switch -- cloudy is f16 and sunny is f22 (rounding up to the nearest whole stop). The older ones are fixed at around f16. The shutter is pretty consistent between models -- around 1/100. So "Sunny 16" with 400 speed film suggests that shooting at f22 in bright sunlight will overexpose the film by one stop. f16, by two stops. As such, I think it would be okay to develop normally. If you shot in any other light, you might ask the lab to push it by one stop. But given the parameters here, that might be splitting hairs.
    I don't think so.............
    http://microsites.lomography.com/holga/specifications
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  4. #14
    bvy
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildbill View Post
    The specs are useless. The actual apertures, reported from people who have disassembled the thing and taken measurements, are more like f13.3 (working cloudy setting, and the original fixed setting) and f20 (working sunny setting). As I said, I was rounding up to simplify the math.

    See:
    http://photondetector.com/articles/holga-apertures/
    http://www.squarefrog.co.uk/basics/apertures.html
    http://www.flickr.com/groups/8688152...7622305428011/

  5. #15
    Ricardo Miranda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iridium View Post
    Hello,

    I bought recently a batch of expired (2002) Kodak Portra 400 NC 120 in order to use them in a HOLGA project. The seller told me that the rolls were refrigerated and when he had tried one of them, a few time ago, looked ok. However, I had read somewhere that it might be better to overdevelop +1/3 for better results.

    Thus, should I ask for C41 overdeveloping in the lab or doesn't matter? In fact, I want normal colour quality.

    Regards,

    F
    If you want normal colour quality then why buy expired film?
    There's nothing wrong in using some expired colour film for "special effects". But, for normal colour work it is always best to use fresh film!
    The remaining film industry will appreciate you to use their fresh film.
    Remember this: buy fresh, shoot the lot and develop ASAP keeps the film industry producing all those nice hight quality films. Buy expired film and in 20 years there might not be any film left for your children to use!
    My cameras:
    Nikon F4, F4S, F401S, F601, F801, F801S, F50, F55, F60, F65, F70, F75, F80, F90, F90X, EL2, FE, FM, FG, FG-20, EM

  6. #16
    Ricardo Miranda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    I would forget about that and throw it out right now. Voice of experience. It's just plain no good.
    +1 Well said Sir!
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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ricardo Miranda View Post
    +1 Well said Sir!
    I think you need to separate your motives. What Tom is saying is simply not true. Just because it falls in line with your motive to buy new film for sustainability reasons doesn't mean expired film is unusable.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  8. #18

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    I've used Portra 160 3 years out of date. Wanna see a picture that no amount of Photoshopping could help? I had 5 rolls of it that came from a known source--new, bought by ME. After it ruining 3 rolls of my work, I threw the rest out. I say again: get rid of it.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails sunflowers.jpg  

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    I've used Portra 160 3 years out of date. Wanna see a picture that no amount of Photoshopping could help? I had 5 rolls of it that came from a known source--new, bought by ME. After it ruining 3 rolls of my work, I threw the rest out. I say again: get rid of it.
    Wanna see four years out of date Portra 160 that looks as good as brand new?


  10. #20
    bvy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    I've used Portra 160 3 years out of date. Wanna see a picture that no amount of Photoshopping could help? I had 5 rolls of it that came from a known source--new, bought by ME. After it ruining 3 rolls of my work, I threw the rest out. I say again: get rid of it.
    You're overlooking motives. Some people enjoy the unpredictability of expired film. Others are looking at your "failure" and their mouths are watering. For those who shoot casually and like surprises, expired film is hard to beat.

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