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  1. #11
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iridium View Post
    I will ask from the lab to give me a little bit of stabilizer.

    Therefore, after loading the film on the reel, should I first immerse it in the water without wetting agent for a few minutes and then a final bath in the stabilizer mix before hanging it to dry?

    Or maybe first try to "...remove the contaminants by gently wiping the non-emulsion side with a sponge barely moistened in distilled water"?
    First wash the film after it comes out of the fix / blix. Then stabilizer. (Remove excess stabilizer at this stage if desired). Hang to dry.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #12

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    First wash the film after it comes out of the fix / blix. Then stabilizer...
    Thanx, but the film is already processed. I want only remove the contaminants on the gelatin. Thus, I'll wash first and then I'll put it in the stabilizer and I hope that something good will happen...

  3. #13
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iridium View Post
    Thanx, but the film is already processed. I want only remove the contaminants on the gelatin. Thus, I'll wash first and then I'll put it in the stabilizer and I hope that something good will happen...
    You will certainly do your film no harm by doing this. Better late than never.
    Any damage done will not be reversible most likely. But do what you can.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #14

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    I use the Unicolor powder kit. With the first kit I used the stabilizer as-is and got white drying marks (interestingly, only on 35mm film, not on 120 film). With the second kit, I added 1/2 teaspoon PhotoFlo concentrate to 1 liter of stabilizer and it eliminated the white drying marks. I found I had to add another 1/2 teaspoon PhotoFlo concentrate after 10 rolls of film (I get a total of 15 rolls from a 1-liter kit).

  5. #15

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    I just happened upon this site and this brings back memories.

    I worked along with with Bob Chapman at Unicolor in the mid-70's. There is alot I have forgotten specifically about the various formulas, but K2 stabilizer contained a wetting agent (like Photo-flo), formaldehyde, and probably a pH adjuster.

    Soak the negatives gently and allow the emulsion to swell and then use stabilizer. To minimize spotting, you can carefully wipe the negative with a photo-grade spong soaked in stabilizer (but wring out excess stabilizer) to remove excess solution to minimize spots. The emulsion will absorb the stabilizer it needs to protect the dyes.

    Bill

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