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  1. #51
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Do they still make interneg film at least?
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  2. #52
    bvy
    bvy is online now

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    Do they still make interneg film at least?
    I think we're going in circles. The short answer is no, though PE has suggested using Portra 160 for interneg, and pulling it during development to tame contrast. Maybe he can elaborate (again).

  3. #53
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Thanks for the clarification!
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  4. #54
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    No interneg films. I have lots of Portra based internegas here with some Ektachrome and Kodachrome comparisons. It will take me a few days to resize them and put them up here though.

    Sorry.

    PE

  5. #55

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    The best dupe film ever was Astia 100F sheet film, even better than CDU or EDupe. But it's now in short supply and officially discontinued.
    Making a precise dupe requires masking skills anyway - but then you can produce a printing master exactly matched to your paper contrast.
    And I "suspect" that Portra 160 is capable of being a decent interneg film, but am still experimenting off and on - a low priority on my project
    list. I've done a few big prints that way but still need to fine-tune things. Again, unsharp masking is the best way to precisely match the characteristics of the original chrome to the intended output characteristics of the interneg. But certain idiosyncrasies in hue characteristics are inevitable, esp if you are trying to tame something like Velvia. Quality-wise, it's a lot easier to print RA-4 directly from color negs.

  6. #56
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    C41 is also vastly cheaper than Ilfochrome ever was. Fancy printing a 3m pano on Ilfochrome? A cool $3,400.
    Pros using analogue still do shoot transparencies, Roger. They won't touch C41 because it doesn't have the punch. I may occasionally use Portra 160 in pinhole, but never seem to gravitate back to negs the same was as Velvia glowing on the lightbox.
    Some pros, sure. I think in advertising it persisted until digital took over and is still used by some. There's also the advantage of just slapping a chrome on a lightbox and viewing it.

    But I was thinking of a friend who ran a custom lab catering mostly to "pros" (loosely, and advanced amateurs) in Knoxville back in the 80s and 90s. The bulk of his professional business was weddings and that was 100% (or close enough) neg film until it went digital and killed off his business.

    I find Ektar 100 has plenty of punch but no, you're right, it still isn't Velvia.

  7. #57

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    I figure I can print Cibas as well as anyone alive (or dead)... done enough of that ... And yeah, I can probably fool anyone into thinking an
    Ektar print onto Fuji Supergloss is a Ciba (except an experienced printer themselves. The white border would be an instant giveaway). In terms
    of color accuracy and ease of correction when printing, the Ektar wins hands down (and I even did portraits on Ciba, so know how to control
    it if anyone does). What I miss about chromes is the ability to simply slap it down on a lightbox and instantly arrive at first base. But with about
    80% less supplementary masking to do in the case of color neg originals, it isn't all that big a deal to make a few more test strips.

  8. #58
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Even the border isn't a 100% giveaway. Someone, I forget who, used to market an easel (for 8x10s only I think) that let you expose the image, then mask the image area and flash the border to give white borders on prints from chromes (or, alternatively, black ones on prints from negs - personally I always liked the black borders.) If you could find one of those or make something like it..

  9. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    I figure I can print Cibas as well as anyone alive (or dead)...


    You're my hero!
    Let me ask you something. If the rule you followed brought you to this, of what use was the rule?

    - Anton Chigurh

  10. #60

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    Roger - more often they simply invert the borders when laser printing onto Supergloss. I actually liked the black borders of Ciba, esp with a
    black overmat. But a compound easel could also be used to reverse the borders of Supergloss and make them black. I just bend with the punches, and do not deliberately try to make color neg shots identical to Ciba - but to make them better! There are somewhat different tricks
    involved, but overall, it is quite a bit easier and certainly less expensive to print color negs. But the notion that it can't compete with chrome
    printing in terms of clean saturation and contrast is now no longer true - and one doesn't need any kind of Fauxtoshop fakery to do that!
    When Ciba first came out, the marketing noise what how easy it was to do at home. And at an elementary level it was. But I guess anything
    that makes the current generation wiggle beyond their high-fructose corn syrup IV drip line is considered just too much work today.



 

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