Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,719   Posts: 1,483,121   Online: 1103
      
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Northern New Jersey
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    78
    Images
    22

    Fujicolor from the Mid 1980's (usable?)

    For a few bucks, I picked up a box with some miscellaneous photo stuff at a garage sale yesterday. There were four 126 cartridges of Fujicolor film, expired early to mid 1980's, 2 each of F-II and HR100. The boxes are sealed and in the one I checked the foil envelope is intact. Is there any hope of using this film? If I tried, what speed should I assume? - box rated at 100. How should I attempt to process them? I can do both regular black and white or c-41 at home.

    I'm hoping to get some kind of image because I want to show my kids my old Kodak Instamatic X-15 in action, and I'd love to make use of a couple of the flashcubes that also came in the box.

    Anyone have any experience with film this old?
    Louis
    (Paladin1420)

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,498
    Colour film from the 1980's will probably be, at the most optimistic, way past its best now, particularly if the storage conditions are unknown. However, if you like experimenting, it's well worth a try.

    Even fresh colour negative film dislikes underexposure, so I would bracket at reduced film speeds, e.g. 50 or 25 ASA.

    Check that the film is C41 process (the old C22 process is now only done by one-or-two specialist - and expensive - labs, and the processes are not interchargeable). With old B&W film it is possible to tweak processing times, choose the best developer, etc., but C41 is a standardised process, so just keep to your usual methods. Let us know how it works out.

    (And don't throw away the cartridges and backing paper...these are much sort after for reloading.)

  3. #3
    Tom1956's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    US
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,688
    C-41 has been the standard since the early 70's, and a X-15 is a simple box camera. Not much you can do but shoot in the most glaring sun possible.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Northern New Jersey
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    78
    Images
    22
    Thanks for the replies. I hadn't thought about saving the cartridges and paper (I forgot about the paper). In the old days, I would just crack the cartridge open to get at the film then toss it. I'll have to be more delicate with these.
    I'd also forgotten that there aren't any adjustments on the x-15 so I'll have to stick to broad daylight.
    If I get any results, I'll try to post them.
    Louis
    (Paladin1420)

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Connecticut
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    59
    The aperture on the X-15 is f11 and the shutter speed is 1/90 sec. With the flash attached, the shutter speed is 1/45 sec.
    Try to over expose as much as you can. I had ok results with old Kodacolor II overexposed three stops and pushed one stop in development. This was 1979 vintage film. The extra development helped with the contrast.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin