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  1. #11
    RPC
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    Myself I use the stop bath, as it is required, and rinse. I believe PE has said the ferricyanide bleach has not been tested with C-41 dyes so its actual long term effects are uncertain. With regular bleach getting harder to get though, I have elected to take my chances. If anyone knows of any actual harm caused by the use of ferricyanide bleach on C-41 dyes, please advise.

  2. #12

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    Interesting. I've been following Kodak's and Jobo's processing instructions and neither call for a stop and rinse after the developer but go straight to the bleach. Kodak doesn't call for a rinse after the bleach but Jobo does (3-minutes with 6 changes of water) which I do. Why do you think both leave out the stop step?

    Also I took a close look and smell of the fixer when I got home this afternoon. It's clear as a bell and has a somewhat strong odor but not like rotten eggs.

    Thomas
    Thomas

    No art passes our conscience in the way that film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls.
    — Ingmar Bergman

  3. #13
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    It should smell pungently sulfurous and vinegary. Rotten eggs (H2S) indicates that it's starting to sulfate, but it is still perfectly good even to the point where it starts to precipitate, though capacity reduces at that point.

  4. #14
    RPC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Taylor View Post
    I've been following Kodak's and Jobo's processing instructions and neither call for a stop and rinse after the developer but go straight to the bleach. Kodak doesn't call for a rinse after the bleach but Jobo does (3-minutes with 6 changes of water) which I do. Why do you think both leave out the stop step?
    The stop and rinse is only required if a ferricyanide bleach is used, not the standard bleach.

  5. #15

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    tetenal also calls for stop bath in certain cases with their 2 bath kit.

    You can get just the fixer part of our C-41 kit, it makes 3.6 liters of working solution from a 900ml stock container (can be used at least 3 times), if this makes it easier for you. shelve life is at least 24 months, and 6-8 months for mixed working solution. OP, or any other interested party can PM me for more info.
    CatLABS of JP
    Darkroom resources and service

    www.catlabs.info | https://www.facebook.com/CatLABS.of.JP | www.jobo-usa.com

  6. #16

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    You can always test a fixer by checking the time it takes to clear a small piece of film, like part of the leader of a roll. You can use either black and white or color film.

    Color film fixers are generally non-hardening rapid fixers. They are about the same strength as regular rapid fixers, but the pH is higher, generally around 6.5. C-41 fixer contains EDTA, but ECN-2 fixer does not. This may have something to do with the dyes, which must be considered with color fixers. Regular rapid fix is too acid. TF-5 is the right pH, but it may have ingredients that affect the dyes. It is easy to mix up F-34, which is the ECN-2 fixer.

    C-41 fixer
    This was listed as the “semi-official” formula for the Kodak C-41 process.

    Water 800 ml
    Ammonium thiosulfate (58%) 162 ml
    Ethylenediamine tetracetic acid disodium salt 1.25g
    Sodium bisulfite 12.4 g
    Sodium sulfite 2.4 g
    Water to make 1 l
    pH at 80F = 6.5

    Ref: Dignan Photographic Newsletter, July 1974

  7. #17

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    Thanks a lot for the reply’s everyone – just getting back from Friday “tapas!”

    Yes, it does have a pronounced vinegary smell, polyglot, and what is truly surprising to me is that it is still good after all these years (since May, 2009) in a partially filled container. The developer also surprised me but the color matched what Kodak said would be good chemistry.

    Thanks a lot for your informative post CatLabs and I will definitely keep that in mind for the future. But since I still have some remaining and have an order in with Calumet from whom I have purchased color chemistry for several years now and have also gotten good deals from in the past on other merchandise (e.g., they sold me brand new Fidelity Elite 8x10 holders (2 pack) for $68 each a couple of years back when I moved into 8x10), I'm going to keep my order with them in place for now.

    A double thank you nworth for that formula! Except for the Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid disodium salt (I have Bostick & Sullivan's EDTA tetrasodium EDTA and I assume that your formula calls for the EDTA disodium salt (http://stores.photoformulary.com/-st...alt/Detail.bok), I have all the chemistry listed. Until TF5 came out I mixed my own TF4 and still have ~ 400mL of 60% Ammonium Thiosulfate remaining. I also assume that your formula is for mixing the stock solution. If so, does it call for mixing 200mL of stock with 800mL of water to make 1000mL of working solution?

    Again, thanks to all who took the time to respond.

    Thomas
    Thomas

    No art passes our conscience in the way that film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls.
    — Ingmar Bergman

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