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  1. #1
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    Developing E-6 film as a color NEGATIVE

    Which is better and why?

    Developing the E-6 film in C-41 dev (CD4) or in RA4 dev (CD3)? I know that color film needs heroic blix strength and that the RA4 type might not be strong enough. Assume that that part is solved. Focus upon the developer.

    Also, is there an advantage with processing the E-6 film FIRST in a B&W developer, then in the color developer? (Perhaps for added contrast or more muted saturation.) I can work out times and temp. (Your replies will be indicative as to whether this topic is too hackneyed.) - David Lyga
    Last edited by David Lyga; 10-11-2013 at 09:07 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2

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    I cannot offer advice on what to do with the development stage but it strikes me as a little odd that you would want to. Surely using C41 colour negative film would be far better on cost alone. E6 slide film is getting on for almost double the cost of C41. Are you after some sort of special effect? Don't forget if you bleach an E6 film after the 1st development stage to get the negative, you would not have the orange mask of conventional C41 fil which may make printing it a little difficult,

  3. #3
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    I have a bulk roll of Ektachrome 200 that is still good. And other slide films as well. -David Lyga

  4. #4

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    Color film is designed specifically to be developed in a particular developer using a specific color developing agent. Any deviation from this will produce color shifts and possible crossover which may not be correctable during the printing stage. Probably not a good idea unless you want a peculiar color effect. PE would be able to be more specific as to the actual color changes.
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  5. #5

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    I have tinkered with limited success with reversal processing using C41 developer and bleach and fix. You can see the results here http://www.flickr.com/photos/2830552...7630542365440/. I was pretty much shooting in the dark as far as times and first developer dilutions go but everything I had read previously had said you need a long strong first developer to avoid under development. I think mine was too long/strong as all of my shots were overdeveloped. I've never gone back to it as I can get E6 processing done for £2.75 locally so I have no need but I liked the experiment. With further experimentation I am sure you could get better results.

    I've also done lots of more 'traditional' cross-processing back in the day. Just developing slide film in C41 chemicals using the standard times and temperature. You tend to get increased contrast and saturation and often very strong colour casts. These can be corrected or accentuated to a certain degree depending on what you are after.

  6. #6
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    But Sinonh82, I am not talking about REVERSAL PROCESSING. Instead, I am referring to processing REVERSAL FILM NOT as a positive, but as a NEGATIVE so I can make a print from it. In other words, consider E-6 film as if it were PRINT film. - David Lyga

  7. #7
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    Just search for cross-processing. There are tons of posts out there. I think any question of what's better requirs your to state what you are trying to achieve. I don't think you will get results nearly as good (technically, but not maybe esthetically) as using a good color negative film. But at it's simplest just run the film through the C-41 chemicals at the normal times. Adjust the exposure index as needed and add filtration if the color balance is off. Each film will be different. The contrast will be high. The Fuji films come out very green so a magenta filter is helpful. The Kodak films are more neutral. I've never tried using RA4 chemicals. In any case you should experiment to see what you like best.

  8. #8
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    Which is better and why?

    Developing the E-6 film in C-41 dev (CD4) or in RA4 dev (CD3)? I know that color film needs heroic blix strength and that the RA4 type might not be strong enough. Assume that that part is solved. Focus upon the developer.

    Also, is there an advantage with processing the E-6 film FIRST in a B&W developer, then in the color developer? (Perhaps for added contrast or more muted saturation.) I can work out times and temp. (Your replies will be indicative as to whether this topic is too hackneyed.) - David Lyga
    David,

    You're not going to like this probably BUT I've seen some AMAZING E-6 processed in C-41 chemistry, I believe it requires an EI of -2 stops (200 speed film shot at 50) and it looks really great, the blues and sand colors are really lovely, I forget the guys name who does it often, I'm sorry but I do know one thing, he SCANNS his film, so I'm not sure how it would look printed because of the lack of orange mask. But processed in C-41 and scanned, it looks really great, especially Velvia and Provia, not so sure about Ektachrome 200.

    I'm about to do a run of C-41 though, if you send me a roll I can shoot it and scan it and send the results without touchups and show you what it looks like?


    Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  9. #9
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I have always preferred the look of C41 film developed in E6.. Basically you need to under expose and push process, the best ones I have seen are 4 stop pushes. This really pisses off the Refrema operator and has to be done in off hours.

    I have been thinking of making a series of chromes exactly like this. very cool look IMO.

  10. #10
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    John Callow here on APUG has done more E6 in C41 film than anyone I have ever came across and could add some insight.

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