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  1. #11
    ROL
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    As a an old slide shooter, long before becoming a devoted practitioner of the fine black (and white) art of the GSP, I have thousands of those 35mm Koda- and Ekta- chrome slides mouldering away in boxes of all kinds, waiting for me to do the right thing and scan them. I have ashamedly scanned but a small percentage, even though I understand it is the right thing to do at this point. All this logic and rationalization even though I cannot justify hauling out the Carousel and Da-light screen ever again to show them. Once they're scanned and "saved" all those lovely colors can be seen, and largely restored if necessary, at will on a computer or large screen television, with near complete ease and safety. I would think that only then, would it make sense to ever haul out irreplaceable memories for special occasions to be projected – and perhaps worth it. It seems more a question of the unknown, for some slides, limited lifespan of the media versus presumed risk.


    FWIW, I turn collections of old slides into Ken Burns'ed videos, added to my YT channel, where they will likely be judged harshly by GoPro jockeys and ignorant, self–absorbed millenials.
    Last edited by ROL; 10-16-2013 at 11:16 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12
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    I've left Kodachrome 64 and 200 slides in my Carousel SAV-2010 for up to 5 minutes with no apparent damage, either fading or warping. My slides date from the 80s to about 5 years old and none are showing any obvious fading despite having been projected 10+ times in a number of instances and I would estimate for an average of 20 seconds each. I also have some earlier Kodachromes in card mounts from the late 50s to early 60s which look as good as new though I rarely project these myself.
    " ... a cook who relies on nothing but a sharp knife has no guarantee of producing excellent dishes." - Yoshihisa Maitani

  3. #13
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The Kodak lab in Vancouver BC used to have a large booth at our annual fair - the Pacific National Exhibition.

    They used to have 8 slide projectors, 4 dissolve units (I think) and 4 big screens, and the staff at the lab contributed slides for projection at the fair.

    Two weeks long, for 12 hours each day, those projectors would show each of (120?) slides over and over for about 10 seconds each time.

    Most were Kodachrome, but some were Ektachrome.

    At the end of the fair, the slides would go back to the staff member who supplied them, essentially none the worse for wear.

    My Dad used to man the booth each year. On more then one occasion, I saw my (then cute) face up on one or more of those screens.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #14
    Chris Lange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    It's the light, not the heat. Look at any poster taped up in a store-front window. They turn from full color to cyan and black in weeks--in freezing cold weather, just from the sunshine.
    I say that if the lady wants a slide show with her valuable old Kodachromes, keep it short. No need to project it for more than 5 seconds. Scan it, dupe it, or whatever to print it. But protect it.
    Pretty sure that particular example is a consequence of UV light, not just light in general.
    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
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    If you don't have it, then you don't have it.

  5. #15
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Every so often, I run my dads kodachromes from the late 40's thru the mid 60's through my projector for one of the kids to watch. I see no obvious signs of damage on any of them. The kids, now all adults(save for the youngest) want to see what life was like back then. We also have home movies shot on kodachrome stored on vhs tapes, which are not withstanding the test of time.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  6. #16
    Paul Goutiere's Avatar
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    I have exposed many rolls of Kodachrome in the past. I've projected some of them many times as well with no noticeable bad effects.

    But why take the chance with the important ones? Scan them.

  7. #17

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    If they are Kodachromes projecting for a minute or two will not result in a detectible change in density or color shift. I have projected some for up to a half hour for doing pastel drawings with no noticeable change. I think you'd need several hours of exposure to projector light to see really measurable differences.

    With dark storage my older Kodachromes begin to fade at around 40 years depending on who did the processing.

    Tom1956 many posters are done using notoriously poor non archival ink so are absolutely subject to fading rapidly in sunlight and even subdued light.

    Nate Potter, Austin TX.

  8. #18

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    I've many of my late Father's Kodachromes (all Kodak factory processed) from the 1960's which he used extensively for public and private shows and these still look fine. I'm sure, in normal circumstances, damage in a minute could only be from a faulty projector or over-powered lamp; he used a Leitz Pradovit (which I still have) and slides are barely warm after even 10 minutes projection.
    I've scanned the most important ones, but this has been mainly to have a duplicate record, copies for other members of the family or against physical damage rather than any major concerns about projector damage.
    And remember that slides were designed mainly for projection.

  9. #19

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    Here's an interesting link to what Kodak says: http://www.kodak.com/global/en/consu...30Slides.shtml

    Note Prolonged exposure to light and heat adversely affects most photographic dyes. Do not subject valuable original slides to prolonged or repeated projection, e.g., in a commercial display.

    The same holds true for transparencies. Although the level of illumination is usually lower in light boxes, prolonged exposure to light is harmful, especially if direct sunlight (which contains a large amount of ultraviolet radiation) strikes the transparency. Use an ultraviolet absorber for fluorescent lighting displays. Rosco Laboratories, Incorporated, 36 Bush Avenue, Port Chester, NY 10573, produces such an ultraviolet absorber. Use duplicates of valuable originals for displays. Store the originals under the best possible storage conditions, as described in the preceding sectio


    Thomas
    Thomas

    No art passes our conscience in the way that film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls.
    — Ingmar Bergman

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Lange View Post
    Pretty sure that particular example is a consequence of UV light, not just light in general.
    Yep, mainly UV.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

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