Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,276   Posts: 1,534,735   Online: 901
      
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 41

Thread: Kodak ektar 100

  1. #31

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    618
    I understand Ektar 100 is supposed to be a film which can look like slide film, but be processed in the more convenient C41 manner. I've used it a fair bit in colourful locations such as Hawaii, but I still find myself preferring Velvia.

    If you're post-processing in some way though, you can likely achieve the look you want with either.

  2. #32

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ajman - U.A.E.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    951
    Quote Originally Posted by thegman View Post
    I understand Ektar 100 is supposed to be a film which can look like slide film, but be processed in the more convenient C41 manner. I've used it a fair bit in colourful locations such as Hawaii, but I still find myself preferring Velvia.

    If you're post-processing in some way though, you can likely achieve the look you want with either.
    If i have to choose only 2 films of any format for B&W and colors then this list will be what i choose [not necessary others have the same]:

    B&W: Acros 100, TMAX 400
    Color neg: Reala 100, Ektar 100
    Color slide: Velvia 50, Vlevia 100F

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,572
    Just remember that there is one big distinction: with a slide film, you can simply slap the slide down on a decent light box and judge whether
    or not you've correctly exposed it. With color neg film, you've got to have some kind of intermediate, be it a contact sheet or preview scan.
    Misleading errors can occurs in the intermediate step itself. And small-format Ektar in particular does not respond well to casual scans. There are distinct technical reasons for this, which I will not go into because this is the wrong forum for it. So you really need to assess your workflow and endpoint (print or otherwise) when you get involved with a film like this. Sometimes working with it is a bit like power-steering: a little bit too much this way or that and things can get out of control quickly. But there are also rewards having a film with this kind of performance. And if you want something C41 that will give you clean saturated colors like a chrome, this is it. But the actual contrast level is less than any chrome film. So comparisons to Velvia are nonsense, though it is rather rich compared to other color neg films.

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,572
    Thegman, I recently printed some 4x5 and 6x7 Hawaii shots with Ektar, and have compared them to past chromes of similar subject matter.
    It certainly picks up the turquoise in tropical waters much better than any chrome film. But the real test is in the neutrals. I shot some of it
    in the crater of Haleakala, for example, and differentiating the subtle variations in all those warm earthtones and complex grays actually came out quite a bit more accurately than any E6 film I have used. I'm choosing this as my color film when we back to the islands next month. One
    thing I constantly stress is to use color temp correction filters under overcast bluish skies, esp a pinkish skylight and 81A when needed. I also
    always carry an 81C for deep blue shade. I won't go into the technical reason why here, but I certainly have paid my dues in learning this
    the hard way.

  5. #35
    Regular Rod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Derbyshire
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    450
    Quote Originally Posted by alex millman View Post
    I am thinking about buying 20 rolls of kodak ektar 100. What do all of you guys think of the film? Is it worth it?
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	9638885234_5a590e3c27_b.jpg 
Views:	51 
Size:	513.1 KB 
ID:	76503

    I like it. The colours are not nasty. Like any other negative film you can control the outcome to suit yourself. I use box speed and expose as if I was using B&W negative film, i.e. make sure the shadows get enough exposure...

    RR

  6. #36

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    823
    There are probably as many perspectives on results from Kodak Ektar 100 as there are users, scenes, lighting and how they achieve results. I have used Kodak Ektar since it was first made available in the US and have nothing but excellent results from it as shown in a couple of examples below.

    Kodak Ektar 100, about a 40 minute aperture priority autoexposure of the Hoover Dam at night using the Pentax LX . . .





    Four frames of Kodak Ektar 100 of the Watson Mill Bridge covered bridge . . .



    Kodak Ektar 100 is a fantastic negative film!

  7. #37

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Richmond VA.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,796
    I love Ektar 100!

    Jeff

  8. #38
    DanielStone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,962
    Images
    1
    Ektar 100 is a really good film.
    shoot it, have fun!

    Make sure you expose and process it correctly. It behaves like a slide film(but has more DR), but you get a negative. It's more contrasty, but if you expose it @50ASA(like I do), the 1 stop in over-exposure helps to lessen the contrast a bit by providing another stop of exposure to the shadows(well, everything, but you're not clipping your shadow values any more than you would by exposing @ ASA100).

    cheers,
    Dan

    -Dan

  9. #39
    Helinophoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Norway
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    562
    Images
    20
    I really like the film too, and the film seems to like brightly lit scenes and sunlight.

    My experience seems to point to color cast in shadows, if the rest of the scene is color-balanced. (scanning).
    Color-wise, I find it to portray them very true, if a bit saturated (but I like saturated, so).

    Shot some Velvia and Ektar back-to back a few weeks ago and it's not very easy to tell the difference between the two with the fall colors I got.
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  10. #40
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,857
    I echo most of the others. It's a great film. Drew's advice is on the money for critical work, but less critical work is pretty easy. I've had no problems exposing it. I've not tried drastic overexposure but my usual color neg tactic of metering the shadows and giving a tad more works just fine.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin