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Thread: Kodak ektar 100

  1. #1

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    Kodak ektar 100

    I am thinking about buying 20 rolls of kodak ektar 100. What do all of you guys think of the film? Is it worth it?

  2. #2
    LJH
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    Perhaps you could provide some idea on a) the research you've already done and b) how/why you came to the conclusion that you are "...thinking about buying 20 rolls of kodak ektar 100"?

    Without knowing what you're after in a film, and for what use(s), these is a pretty vacuous questions.

  3. #3

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    I think you are talking about 35mm if you want 20 rolls, for me, the best color negative i've used so far is Reala 100 on 120 only and then followed by Ektar 100, also new Kodak Portra films [160/400/800] are decent too, so i can confirm that Ektar 100 is a nice color neg to use, doesn't matter what you want to use it for, just know how to meter the exposure and use good lab to process it if you will not do it yourself and you are good to go.

  4. #4

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    I suggest you buy ONE and try it for yourself.

    The color is very saturated. I found it to be not to my liking. You may have different opinions.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

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    I am looking for bright, saturated colours. Something similar to a reversal film. I have been told however, the colours can be nasty. I would just like to know what your experiences with this film have been like.

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    Well.... your question really is not answerable. The color IS bright and saturated. It's high contrast. But "nasty" is not something you can define. I would not use this film for subjects where skin tones are important. But, for landscapes, it could be nice. Then again, there is a member here who likes this film for portraits. It's all subjective. Really... try one and you'll see it right away. It's a unique film.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  7. #7

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    I just exposed a roll for the first time. I hate oversaturated colors so I have no idea why I bought that film in the first place. About half of what I shot was portraits so I think I'll be disappointed, but I can't wait to have it processed in case I am wrong.

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    Quality-wise, Ektar is absolutely superb. But being higher-saturation, higher-contrast compared to most color neg films, it isn't going to forgive exposure errors; and it won't soften a bad complexion, if you are thinking about portraiture. Know how to use a light meter. If you can routinely expose slide films correctly, it's a piece of cake. Otherwise, pick an amateur film instead. But how are you going to look at the actual shots afterwards??? It won't forgive sloppy scanning or printing as easily either.

  9. #9
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    %90 of Ektar prints I have ever seen were terrible. Especially the homogene grey cyan sky colors, the foliage colors and the sea. Skin colors were like plastic. I always asked myself how Kodak manage to produce that awful film ?

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by LJH View Post
    Perhaps you could provide some idea on a) the research you've already done and b) how/why you came to the conclusion that you are "...thinking about buying 20 rolls of kodak ektar 100"?

    Without knowing what you're after in a film, and for what use(s), these is a pretty vacuous questions.
    Research? Conclusions? Why does every decision in life of late have to come with a scientific paper!?

    OP, this guy would obviously prefer that you got the densitometer out and spent your photographic life indoors. I'm sure most others here, who actually enjoy making pictures, would suggest that you shoot some and come to a 'conclusion' with your eyes... and more to the point - do it while the film is still available. I've got a funny feeling Ektar is slowly slipping by the wayside.
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

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