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  1. #21

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    Wind is not a killer if you use a metal camera with lenscone :-)

  2. #22
    wildbill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by didjiman View Post
    Wind is not a killer if you use a metal camera with lenscone :-)
    Oh. Do I put the trees, leaves, and other objects inside the cone to keep them from moving? Please explain further, I don't understand. Post an image of this concept, perhaps.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildbill View Post
    Oh. Do I put the trees, leaves, and other objects inside the cone to keep them from moving? Please explain further, I don't understand. Post an image of this concept, perhaps.
    He must not get the same kind of wind as I do, I could put a boulder on top oft camera and still worry about the wind lol.

    And yes, this darn trees never hold still...
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  4. #24

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    Ha! Around here in the Spring I've had sudden gusts of wind pick up my whole 8x10 and big wooden Ries tripod just like a kite and toss it
    fifteen yards of so. I'm just lucky it's never had a hard landing yet. The compendium lenshade is probably what has prevented the lenses
    from ever getting damaged. All it takes is moment for either the wind to cause a problem, or for things to settle enough to get the shot. But
    I might have to wait twenty minutes for that opportunity. But when things get hopeless, I carry a P67 system instead.

  5. #25
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Croubie View Post
    The closer one may be close to what you can get with a CPL, but it still looks a bit more over-saturated, so still I'm saying the wider one is closer to real film...

    I think you are right because the shadow areas show more detail in the wide angle shot. So the details had to be there in the original. I probably added more contrast and saturation to the zoomed in picture. Of course this raises a point. If you not printing chemically, and why would you nother using chromes in that case, then the opriginal colors can change anyway once you scan and adjust. So what matter which Velvia version you select?

    Thnaks Stone for your comments too. Alan.

  6. #26
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Klein View Post
    I think you are right because the shadow areas show more detail in the wide angle shot. So the details had to be there in the original. I probably added more contrast and saturation to the zoomed in picture. Of course this raises a point. If you not printing chemically, and why would you nother using chromes in that case, then the opriginal colors can change anyway once you scan and adjust. So what matter which Velvia version you select?

    Thnaks Stone for your comments too. Alan.
    Hey Alan,

    I think it's because I like to have some sort of truth in my image, I don't use Photoshop, and I don't understand how to manipulate images in that way, I do know that I like the image to appear the way it is on film on the screen, with chrome's I can look at the image and make sure that the scan matches the actual chrome on a lightboard that's in front of me. Also there's sort of this I don't know how to explain it but it's a look, I can usually spot a chrome over some other version of an image simply because of the special look, I think it's the way the black drops off in the shadows and gives a sort of definitive line to areas of the image almost like a drawing when the artist from say a comic book, has to outline things with a black ink first.

    I also like the saturation, I tend to personally do a lot of long exposure work with my chrome's, and in that situation I have not found a way to duplicate the kind of saturation that I get with a chrome in digital form without it looking really poor.

    I also certainly can't get the same look with C-41 film, not even EKTAR100 will match my chrome images, and I've only seen one image made by Polyglot on Ektar100 that ever matched the kind of look I enjoy with film.

    Because I don't print optically, at least not yet, I enjoy shooting the crumbs and then scanning them much better than I do shooting color negative film and then scanning that.

    Perhaps someday when I start to print optically, I'll regret not having the originals on a different type of film, but I just love the results I get, and the power of looking at the images on a light box.

    I started to consider maybe switching some of my smaller format onto C-41 but still shooting the large-format chromes, there's nothing like seeing a 4 x 5 color chrome on the lightbox is just so amazingly powerful!
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  7. #27
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Velvia 100F is difficult to scan because of its quirky red and yellow-green channels that are almost always overcooked when picked up by scanners. The palette must be stripped and virtually rebuilt to get the right look, then the printing difficulties too. Really, too much trouble for what it's worth. 100F was never popular, almost thought of as an experiment that had gone badly wrong for Fuji, and they know it. Velvia 100 is essentially the same as 50: a boost to the speed but with a lower clipping point; it is known for its very pure whites but it can look way too red/purplish when scanned. Like 100F, its greens are nowhere near as triumphant as 50. The majority of photographers will always gravitate back to RVP 50 after disappointing themselves (or having a disaster) using either/both of 100 or 100F. I finished using 100F around 4 years ago after scrutining a lot of work done on it in rainforests (heaps of green), afterglow (after sunset — purple, pink and blue) and was reasonably happy with the last category but never with rainforest imaging: it just was not right under polarisation and the greens were lily-livered and lacking in delivery. As for 100, very easily blowing out highlights and blocking up shadows — akin to a slap in the face and a sock in the eye, was enough to throw out the other 3 rolls. If photographers want to use 100 I recommend very careful metering and err on the side of underexposure (e.g. –0.3). If anything blows (e.g. mild spectrals in water, on trees etc.) it will be unrecoverable.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  8. #28
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Velvia 100F is difficult to scan because of its quirky red and yellow-green channels that are almost always overcooked when picked up by scanners. The palette must be stripped and virtually rebuilt to get the right look, then the printing difficulties too. Really, too much trouble for what it's worth. 100F was never popular, almost thought of as an experiment that had gone badly wrong for Fuji, and they know it. Velvia 100 is essentially the same as 50: a boost to the speed but with a lower clipping point; it is known for its very pure whites but it can look way too red/purplish when scanned. Like 100F, its greens are nowhere near as triumphant as 50. The majority of photographers will always gravitate back to RVP 50 after disappointing themselves (or having a disaster) using either/both of 100 or 100F. I finished using 100F around 4 years ago after scrutining a lot of work done on it in rainforests (heaps of green), afterglow (after sunset — purple, pink and blue) and was reasonably happy with the last category but never with rainforest imaging: it just was not right under polarisation and the greens were lily-livered and lacking in delivery. As for 100, very easily blowing out highlights and blocking up shadows — akin to a slap in the face and a sock in the eye, was enough to throw out the other 3 rolls. If photographers want to use 100 I recommend very careful metering and err on the side of underexposure (e.g. –0.3). If anything blows (e.g. mild spectrals in water, on trees etc.) it will be unrecoverable.
    Good to know this is great info, thanks, I've heard before people say that you should underexposed it and read it at 80 or something like that, so that makes sense. What I want to know is where to get one of these special color filters for long exposure, that are mentioned in the data sheets I need a 77mm if possible.
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  9. #29

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    One man's medicine is another man's poison. I thought 100F was the pick of the litter. But any Velvia will be hard to actually print, and needs
    very careful metering. I only used it for low-contrast scenes which needed a deliberate boost. Alas, the selection of slide films in general is
    rapidly collapsing.

  10. #30
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    I probably referred to it as the "pick of the litter", or words to that effect, years and years ago working solely in 35mm (the hardest format to get right with Velvia). The results printed to Ilfochrome, frankly, looked bloody awful.. RVP 50 is quite easy to print in the hybridised (A->D) process, no problems there and it really does come up beautifully, but like everything else, the end result depends on how well you have exposed the scene. The low-contrast scenes you speak of are the target use of RVP 50. It's not unheard of for any Velvia to be used in weddings and commercial jobbing, though I cringe at the thought of a bride with rosy cheeks coming up ... bolder than roses, so to speak.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






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