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  1. #1
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Why is there so much velvia100f in sheets?

    Hey guys, I'm not sure this is the right form to put this in so mods please feel free to move it.

    So I've been doing a lot more large-format photography lately, and a while back when they announced that Velvia 50 inch sheet would be discontinued I purchased the last remaining box at freestyle photo...

    Anyway, as far as I understand it the only two films available in transparency from Fujifilm are Provia100f and Velvia100. All other films have been discontinued...

    So my question is how come there's so much velvia100f out there? B&H hasn't had Velvia100 for a very long time, and when I called them to ask about it they said "well we have Velvia100f so you should just buy that" and I said well that's not the film I want I wanted different film they are completely different films.

    Anyway this went back-and-forth a couple times and for some reason I couldn't quite get it through their thick skulls that the two films the being of a similar name would not same film. They said they refused to make any orders of the new stuff when they have so much of this other V100f in stock.

    Freestyle also has a ton of V100f but they do have Velvia100 as well, but it's almost $10 more to buy from freestyle

    I know that Fuji decided to discontinue Velvia100f because they had to choose one over the other and this one didn't sell as well, but is it really that bad?

    I don't really want to buy into a film that is no longer going to be produced and only have a limited supply of it, but there's just so much of it in the world I'm just wondering how different it two are?

    I shot a few rolls of both, however I haven't shot enough to really get a handle on the different characteristics and lighting conditions, I recall someone saying that the 100 version is better with reciprocity failure etc., ? and of course the 100 F is a finer grain but I don't know as far as color saturation how they differ.

    Anyone want to share their thoughts or knowledge about this? Thanks.
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  2. #2
    LJH
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    Lots out there on the differences. Google will give you your answer.

  3. #3

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    I thought that Fuji discontinued only Velvia 50 and Astia 100, not Velvia 100F, but in all cases, i still don't have a final judgment about velvia 100F, i did shoot 2 sheets of velvia 100F and it was just fine, not that much great and not that bad too, i also bought loads of Velvia 50 and stored them for future just in case it may get discontinued and my expectation was right, so i have 100 or 120 sheets which is more than enough if i don't shoot LF much yet, i can always use Velvia 100 and Velvia 100F for test until the time come where i can use that velvia 50 for very important serious shot.

    Meanwhile, i can use velvia on 120 format without any worry, i did shoot velvia 50 and velvia 100 and velvia 100F, my best so far was from velvia 100F, so i can't tell if that is true with LF as well, but if i know how to use velvia 50 properly or correctly then it may remain my best favorite slide film, you have to shoot more sheets of velvia 100 and velvia 100F to tell the difference and favor one over the other, you may prefer velvia 100 more but some others may go with velvia 100F more, and Fuji stated that Velvia 100F is a new generation or new improvement of Velvia 100, so how come they produce it and keep selling it if it is the weakest link here?

  4. #4

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    The shadow characteristics are a bit different, but in sheets I strongly preferred 100F because it was made on a dimensionally-stable
    polyester base instead of unstable triacetate. But I never used much anyway.

  5. #5
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    The shadow characteristics are a bit different, but in sheets I strongly preferred 100F because it was made on a dimensionally-stable
    polyester base instead of unstable triacetate. But I never used much anyway.
    Ahh very meaningful response, hmm the base does matter for long term storage... Will have to figure out for sure which are officially made still.

    My biggest question is saturation, I really enjoy the saturation of the Velvia100 I've shot, but I only shot a few rolls of the 100f and it seemed even less saturated than my Provia100f images, but then that might be the reciprocity differences?
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  6. #6

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    All the Velveeta family were highly saturated and contrasty compared to the mid-range Provia products. It might simply be the case that super saturation is a task taken over more and more by Fauxtoshopping. ... not really the same, but in terms of potential abuse, now the more popular
    option. But if a lot of a product is still around, it's either very popular or someone overbought it in the first place, possibly on purpose before a
    price increase.

  7. #7
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    FYI, Velvia 50 is NOT discontinued. It's only the US distributors who keep saying that, maybe it's officially discontinued in the US but they're still making it in Japan.
    I just bought a pack of the *new* style box from this guy in Japan, it rocked up a week later in aus, and yes, it's the new package, as is the 5x120 I bought, both exp Jan 2015.
    But man, look at that price (still, a sheet is cheaper to buy than to process it around here).

    As for the OP, I think you answered yourself. I've read the story that when they released v100 (or 100f, can't remember), that it was meant to "fix" the problems with the v50 (discontinued original). So many people complained that they brought back the v50 (this is back in 2006 or so). But they still love their 100 versions, so they produce it by the truckload. But it doesn't sell as well as the 50, so shops just have more and more stock. It's also a buttload cheaper than the v50, noone wants it.
    Honestly, for most people who scan, it doesn't make much difference because you can adjust Sat etc in photoshop.
    But Stone, you sound like me, I've heard you say you hate photoshop, I don't even have it (I run linux). Scan and print and nothing in between (maybe crop). Hence I buy my v50 too. But I do also have some 100 and 100F in the freezer that I use on occasions, depending on how 'special' I think the shot will be as to what film I want to waste on it.
    I've still got 18 sheets of Quickload Astia in the freezer, I used my first 2 frames for a portrait of my gf and her grandmas at her 30th, I'm saving the last 18 sheets for something as special.
    Similarly, the v50 I save for those 'spectacular' sunset-landscapes, the v100/f I use for just regular midday shooting and ones where I may get a good shot or may not, so don't want to waste the v50.
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

  8. #8
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Croubie View Post
    FYI, Velvia 50 is NOT discontinued. It's only the US distributors who keep saying that, maybe it's officially discontinued in the US but they're still making it in Japan.
    I just bought a pack of the *new* style box from this guy in Japan, it rocked up a week later in aus, and yes, it's the new package, as is the 5x120 I bought, both exp Jan 2015.
    But man, look at that price (still, a sheet is cheaper to buy than to process it around here).

    As for the OP, I think you answered yourself. I've read the story that when they released v100 (or 100f, can't remember), that it was meant to "fix" the problems with the v50 (discontinued original). So many people complained that they brought back the v50 (this is back in 2006 or so). But they still love their 100 versions, so they produce it by the truckload. But it doesn't sell as well as the 50, so shops just have more and more stock. It's also a buttload cheaper than the v50, noone wants it.
    Honestly, for most people who scan, it doesn't make much difference because you can adjust Sat etc in photoshop.
    But Stone, you sound like me, I've heard you say you hate photoshop, I don't even have it (I run linux). Scan and print and nothing in between (maybe crop). Hence I buy my v50 too. But I do also have some 100 and 100F in the freezer that I use on occasions, depending on how 'special' I think the shot will be as to what film I want to waste on it.
    I've still got 18 sheets of Quickload Astia in the freezer, I used my first 2 frames for a portrait of my gf and her grandmas at her 30th, I'm saving the last 18 sheets for something as special.
    Similarly, the v50 I save for those 'spectacular' sunset-landscapes, the v100/f I use for just regular midday shooting and ones where I may get a good shot or may not, so don't want to waste the v50.
    Wait so if you have both the 100 and the 100 F versions of Velvia, how come you don't know the difference betwen the two? Lol

    And yes I was speaking about the US market, of course in Europe you can still get it, but over here there's no distributors whatsoever for V50.

    As I understand it however the 50 is specifically designed to be shot in low contrast situations, where the 100 versions are better in higher contrast situations, so even those ours to use differently. I just want to know if the 100 or 100 F versions are any different, I do know that one of my favorite shots was shot on the V100, and the other was shot on Provia 100f, and the shots that I did take on V100f came out under exposed, so I can't really tell if I like the film or not I don't have enough experience with it and I obviously failed to expose it properly, these were long exposures and so I'm not sure if it's because I didn't take into account the reciprocity failure that V100f had that the V100 didn't have, or some other reason... I've only shot it a few times (the 100F version) and it was -15F and so I wasn't really able to take notes, i had a hard enough time adjusting the aperture without loosing a finger
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  9. #9
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Wait so if you have both the 100 and the 100 F versions of Velvia, how come you don't know the difference betwen the two? Lol

    And yes I was speaking about the US market, of course in Europe you can still get it, but over here there's no distributors whatsoever for V50.

    As I understand it however the 50 is specifically designed to be shot in low contrast situations, where the 100 versions are better in higher contrast situations, so even those ours to use differently. I just want to know if the 100 or 100 F versions are any different, I do know that one of my favorite shots was shot on the V100, and the other was shot on Provia 100f, and the shots that I did take on V100f came out under exposed, so I can't really tell if I like the film or not I don't have enough experience with it and I obviously failed to expose it properly, these were long exposures and so I'm not sure if it's because I didn't take into account the reciprocity failure that V100f had that the V100 didn't have, or some other reason... I've only shot it a few times (the 100F version) and it was -15F and so I wasn't really able to take notes, i had a hard enough time adjusting the aperture without loosing a finger


    Globally it is inventory-backstocking that is coming onto the market, that's why there is so much available; I suspect though the stock will expire long before it is sold because digital continues to eat away at the market.

    Velvia 100 is very, very contrasty and easily blows highlights and blocks shadows — far too easily and more readily than the stalwart RVP50. Velvia 100F is not the same as 100; the two also have dissimilar palettes and require tweaks of exposure. Reciprocity failure is the very least of your concerns with any Velvia emulsion. The trick is to expose all Velvias in the light they were designed for: diffuse or soft, and never bright point illumination which will show just how tempestuous the emulsions are. Sure, people use Velvias for weddings, that's their prerogative, but it's also a silly choice considering far better emulsions, and non-E6 at that.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  10. #10
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Globally it is inventory-backstocking that is coming onto the market, that's why there is so much available; I suspect though the stock will expire long before it is sold because digital continues to eat away at the market.

    Velvia 100 is very, very contrasty and easily blows highlights and blocks shadows — far too easily and more readily than the stalwart RVP50. Velvia 100F is not the same as 100; the two also have dissimilar palettes and require tweaks of exposure. Reciprocity failure is the very least of your concerns with any Velvia emulsion. The trick is to expose all Velvias in the light they were designed for: diffuse or soft, and never bright point illumination which will show just how tempestuous the emulsions are. Sure, people use Velvias for weddings, that's their prerogative, but it's also a silly choice considering far better emulsions, and non-E6 at that.
    So can you elaborate on the difference specifically between Velvia100 and Velvia100f? In terms of color/contrast?
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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