Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,547   Posts: 1,544,523   Online: 1020
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11
    bvy
    bvy is offline

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    870
    Images
    36
    I did a "dry run" and noticed that with two prewashes at 105F, an ambient temperature of 70F, and NO tempering bath, that the temp only dropped two-and-a-half degrees. The water went in at 102F and came out at 99.5F. What I'll probably try next is a clip test just to satisfy my own curiosity. I'll shoot several frames of the same scene, and develop clips with and without the water bath.

    I do make optical prints, and I do appreciate as little fuss as possible when it comes to filtering. What I might find is that drift is a better solution for people who only scan their negatives.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Georgia, USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    211
    That's less temperature drop than I anticipated. I thought with agitation you would be looking at an exit temp around 96F or so at best. I guess the 105F prewash helped that to some extent.

  3. #13
    adelorenzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    526
    I'm not sure what chemicals you are using but I use Tetenal kits and they provide alternative processing times for developing at 30 C (86 F) that might be something to try. It might be easier to maintain a lower temperature and the longer development times are said to help even out the process. Here's a pretty good write-up with comparisons:

    http://paulagortazar.blogspot.ca/p/t...it-review.html

  4. #14
    RPC
    RPC is offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    377
    Using a lower temperature is not the best way to solve the uneven development problems mentioned in the article. If it was due to agitation he should use a better method. Using a lower temperature always produces crossover. This has been discussed many times before in this forum.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    US
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,060
    In 50 years in photography, every temperature I've ever used was a "drift-by". All temperatures are fleeting, with the best of processes and procedures. Depending on this "averaging " method as your process is not acceptable, imo. A color print starts to go warm toned when you get a degree high, and bluish a degree too low. Without an elaborate and pricey temp set-up, you must rely on cookpots, stoves, and refrigerators. But it does work, although it might take an hour of prep and dry-runs for a single print. But you have to get it right. 1/2 of a degree ±, is your "drift-by". And it's best to do your prep and dry-runs to where even that 1/2 doesn't show up on the thermometer.

  6. #16
    adelorenzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    526
    Quote Originally Posted by RPC View Post
    Using a lower temperature is not the best way to solve the uneven development problems mentioned in the article. If it was due to agitation he should use a better method. Using a lower temperature always produces crossover. This has been discussed many times before in this forum.
    The lower temperature recipe is straight out of the instructions for the Tetenal C-41 kit. I don't think they would include it if it was guaranteed to get bad results.

  7. #17
    RPC
    RPC is offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    377
    Quote Originally Posted by adelorenzo View Post
    The lower temperature recipe is straight out of the instructions for the Tetenal C-41 kit. I don't think they would include it if it was guaranteed to get bad results.
    The C-41 developer was designed to give parallel curves at 100 degrees F and nowhere else. If lower temperature developers could be used for C-41 and give said curves, then Kodak and Fuji would have done so, but they haven't. Other manufacturers in the past have made developers that used low temperatures, but if they had been successful they would likely still be around, but they're not. The results may look acceptable to you, but may not be to someone else. Users are urged to compare print results side by side between film developed at low temps and 100 degrees F (a gray scale or skin tones are preferable) before they decide to stick with a low temp process.
    Last edited by RPC; 11-26-2013 at 02:22 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18
    RPC
    RPC is offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    377
    I would like to clarify the above post that when I said "100 degrees and nowhere else" I was not implying the drift through method should not be used. I was contrasting the standard 100 degree temp with lower temps such as 75, 85, etc. that some makers have used. I believe the drift through can work if you average the correct temperature.

  9. #19
    bvy
    bvy is offline

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    870
    Images
    36
    Thanks. Like you, I wasn't interested in processing at cooler temperatures. My radius/target is still 100F.

    It was this post by PE that got me to consider the idea seriously:
    http://www.apug.org/forums/viewpost.php?p=969773

    Or. to quote:
    I set the temp to about 102 and let it drop to about 98 over the 3'15" development time. It works just fine. Temperature averaging, as it is called, is mentioned on the EK web site.

  10. #20
    chuck94022's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Los Altos, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    602
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    10
    For what it's worth, I started with "drift by", but found that it made me so anxious that I had no enjoyment in the process. This is supposed to be a hobby for me, and hobbies are supposed to bring pleasure, not anxiety.

    All anxiety vanished when I invested in constructing an accurate water bath capable of holding all chemicals at the correct temperature, plus/minus one tenth of a degree, for as long as I desire.

    One thing in particular that is problematic for drift by is if you have to make multiple runs. There is a delay between runs getting the temperature back up to snuff, which I found annoying.

    I also find color correction due to poorly developed negatives to be a royal pain, regardless of whether you are optically printing or scanning. I'd rather get the negatives right at the beginning, it saves a lot of headache.

    Of course, if you are doing c-41 based black and white, I guess none of this is a problem! :-)

    Edit: re-reading the thread, I should note that my "drift by" was in a water bath. It was the bath that was "drifting by", so I was typically well within specs for normal temperature. It just always added stress to keep the bath at temp by hand.
    Last edited by chuck94022; 11-26-2013 at 12:44 PM. Click to view previous post history.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin