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  1. #1

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    Expired Ektacolor Gold - how should I set the ISO?

    Hi all,

    For fun, I've come into possession of 5 rolls of Ektacolor Gold Professional 160. Expired in 1990. Box is in impeccable condition, seller claims it was cold-stored.

    I'm wondering if anyone has suggestions on how I should rate the film's ISO when exposing it. I'm willing to burn a roll or two through experiments - there's every chance I'm burning all of them - but would love it if anyone has any tips to start!

  2. #2

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    Do what you want, but I would not waste a minute of my time with it. Totally worthless and I'd throw it out, saying what a shame.

  3. #3
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Welcome to APUG.

    If you are experimenting for the fun of it, then have fun. But don't use it for critical work.

    I would take notes while test-shooting the first roll, bracketing throughout.

    Expect some colour shifts, so it would be best to shoot under consistent light, being sure to include subjects with easily identifiable colours. Including a grey card and a set of photographic colour patches would be great.

    If they have all been stored together, the first test roll should tell you a fair amount.

    The quality of your lab or your colour balancing skills while printing or scanning may be severely tested.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #4
    Fixcinater's Avatar
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    Welcome to APUG!

    I'd rate it at least 2 stops under nominal ASA and err on the side of more light when figuring exposure per shot, if there is any doubt. Sensitivity drops as it ages and neg film tends to like more light than less even fresh so just keep that in mind and have some fun.

    I recently had some late 80s expired film (Royal Gold 25, Ektacolor 100) souped at the local "pro" lab and nothing turned up so don't get your hopes up too high, just in case.

  5. #5

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    A local ad for a box of over 100 rolls of Kodak Ektar 125 expired in 4/1992 for not much money also piqued my curiosity so I went for it. The owner had no idea about it and that it had been in his garage (Atlanta, GA) for a long time so I went through the first roll just to see and got these





    I've since used a few rolls rated at ISO64. Good luck with it.

  6. #6

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    Hi all,

    Thanks for the lovely welcome and tips - and the experimental data. I agree that it's likely a waste, but it's worth some fun!

    Nothing critical will be shot with the film, so no hearts will be broken if I lose it all.

  7. #7
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    Why 'lose it all', Kevin?

    A slight 'clip test' will reveal all. If you do your own processing take a couple of inches of the film (in the dark!) and put it onto the film aperture window of the back of your camera. Expose at two stops more than indicated for that particular speed at a scene that has both highlight and shadow detail. Make certain that your exposure is accurately determined. Then process normally. That test should determine expected results for the whole batch. Examine the negative closely with a magnifying glass. You can interpolate exposure modifications based upon that initial test: i,e., if you have given too little exposure, give a stop or two more. - David Lyga



 

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