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  1. #1

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    Velvia - use of filters for landscapes.

    Hi all - just want your assistance about filters. I know that Velvia can be saturated at times, a bit worried of when to and when not to use a CPOL filter? Also at sunset time when the color is a bit weak what is the strongest warming filter you would employ? I like to get my slides and see them on the lightbox without post processing. I have one warming filter so I have to check which is mine. What about cooling filters that is for an effect right? I don't shoot landscapes with incandescent, LOL. I think I have a slight blue and a deep filter.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    I've never heard of a Kiwi shooting landscapes with an incandescent light either...
    No POL when there is sky in the scene as only part of the sky will be polarised resulting in an unsightly, uneven patch. No POL at sunset or sunrise for the same reason (to accentuate colours at these times, re-rate Velvia down (EI64) to underexpose slightly). In forests (and New Zealand has some breathtakingly beautiful rainforests e.g. in The Catlins, ravines and deep, enclosed areas) a polariser will saturate the scene certainly, but this polarisation must usually be compensated +1.5 ~ +2.0 (+2.0 in very flat, overcast light — this is my end-point value, spot-metered in medium format) to avoid coming away with an under-exposed and poorly enunciated image. In bright sun (for which Velvia was not designed for) using a polariser in shadowed areas will result in a very strong blue cast — a lot of photographers fancy this — it can result in a very eye-catching image when everything is alien-blue, others use the warming filter you speak of (but never two filters on a highly corrected lens). If you are unsure of what effect you are going to get, bracket your polarised shots +/— 0.5 (third-stop bracketing is usually 'not quite right' in the smaller formats and marginal in medium to large format), lay them all out on the lightbox and refer to notes that you recorded at the time of the shot (of course you did...didn't you!? )

    Ensure you have the correct polariser for your camera's meter e.g. circular or linear (though circular are predominant now). Any modern-era camera with multi-pattern/evaluative/matrix will use a circular POL.

    Re Post-processing: It's better to sort out what you want by understanding filters and the effect they have on the film, in-camera, at the time of the exposure, and not rely on post-processing to correct errors because that can be very, very involved and potentially derange the colour balance across the image.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  3. #3
    Rick A's Avatar
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    At my house, post processing means mounting the slides and loading them into a tray for projection. I only ever use polarizer or UV/have filter with color film. The saturation looks outstanding when projected on a screen across the room, which is what they were intended for.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  4. #4
    Trail Images's Avatar
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    I've used Velvia 50 for years and find it very temperamental to much change with light and filters. Hence, I try not to shoot too much where light is too harsh or scenes requiring filtration.

    However, admittedly I'll use filters as needed. For sunrise / sunset that requires either neutral density or reverse grads I won't hesitate. I will use a CP on a lot of water and or leaves that are wet or moist to prevent glare. Almost never with sky exposure, but will do it for certain effect with 1/4 to 1/2 dialed in. Must be closely viewed when applied. Very rarely I'll use a 81b warming filter in deep shaded areas.
    Just my thoughts on the filter usages.

    Although, I know a photog who very successfully uses a CP with Velvia 50 all the time with excellent results. Most often it is with a ND filter stacked as well. Again, CP dialed in only very slightly as he will clearly point out.

    Overall, it takes field practice with the product you're using and in many cases a shot or two with and then without the filtration. Then deciding in the end what your personal preference is, as well as what gives the best representation of the scene at the time. Unless your preference is to want a very different look and then the radical usage is not a problem.
    Last edited by Trail Images; 01-24-2014 at 10:00 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #5

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    If you're trying to fake something, I can't address that. In terms of basic corrections, to help the film under certain lighting conditions, I'd
    recommend a colorless or very pale pink multicoated skylight filter for distant scenes where UV is an issue, like high altitude or sometimes
    seashore shots. Distant thing will come out a bit sharper. Modest amber light balancing filter like an 81A thru 81C can be useful for preventing
    excessively blue shadows in deep shade under blue skies, though some people like this effect, so don't correct for it. Polarizers are going to
    increase contrast with this already very contrasty film, and should be used with caution. I personally hate the promiscuous use of polarizers -
    resembles amateurish Fauxtoshop tweaking.

  6. #6
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    Here are shots some taken with but most not taken with polarizer. Suggestion. Don't overdo the setting when you use it. It strips the light off of vegetation making it look unreal. If you use it to saturate the colors, turn it down to leave some of the reflections to make it seem normal. Question I have for you guys, what stop increase do you use if the polarizer is at half effective vs. at full block?

    Velvia 50 http://www.flickr.com/photos/alanklein2000/tags/velvia/

    Velvia 100 http://www.flickr.com/photos/alankle...ags/velvia100/

  7. #7
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    I use Velvia 50 in all sorts of lighting conditions. I didn't know I wasn't suppose too.

  8. #8
    Hatchetman's Avatar
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    I recall taking a photo of my fair daughter at sunset. She turned out crimson like an apple! I bought a light blue filter but never got around to trying it.

  9. #9
    Trail Images's Avatar
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    I use Velvia 50 in all sorts of lighting conditions. I didn't know I wasn't suppose too.
    Alan, if it works for you in all conditions then not to worry I would say. Looking at your examples they are excellent !!!!

    For me, the majority of my desert shooting leads me to working in softer light. The exposure latitude just isn't there with most transparencies for real highs and lows. I usually only get to work in sunrise / sunset cycles. Too much past that golden hour and things fall off for the look I like.

  10. #10
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    The secret is knowing which filter to use for the colour temperature of the ambient light if you need to get the absolutely correct colour balance it would involve using a colour temperature meter.
    Ben

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