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  1. #1
    coigach's Avatar
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    Ektar in overcast light samples please

    Hello,

    After years of shooting b+w transparencies I'm now experimenting with 120 colour neg film for landscapes. Have used Portra and I like the muted colours. Sometimes however I'm looking for a bit more 'pop', but not too much...

    Ektar gets a reputation for being very saturated, but I'm not sure how this translates in the overcast, flat light that is common in Scotland. Can somebody please post photos of Ektar used in flat overcast light to give me an idea? (Any other colour neg film suggestions welcome too).

    Cheers,
    Gavin

  2. #2

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    If you are interested in scans of negs, I can provide you with them. All I do is bump the contrast a bit.
    Not so much with scans from prints, since I don't scan them.

  3. #3
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    -I don't mess analog with digital and i stop to scan negative, so no sample here, if you want to scan your films, Ektar is the best out there. But if you print in a classic darkroom don't use it, its a little over contrast and lost tonality in the shadow for my taste. And also its hard to find the right filtration in the analog color-head.
    -Kodak optimize ektar for scanning, and the problem in scanning is the grain which is high because of the way that light in scanner work, even the best of them messed up with grain, thats why i stop to scan.
    -On reason that digital look better in computer screen is that scanning a negative keep away the beauty, deep color of film, flatten the image like lifeless and give grain. So if you want to scan the answer is Ektar, is the best way, but if you print in darkroom forget it, and yes is more contrast than Porta.
    Last edited by alexfoto; 02-24-2014 at 09:56 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #4

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    Examples

    Ektar 100 examples in open shade. Will be able to show true overcast sky later in the week.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 901015182.jpg   901015266.jpg   901015300.jpg  

  5. #5
    Jaf-Photo's Avatar
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    In my experience Ektar looks better in warm sunlight than in the pale northern light (Scandinavia in my case). Here it takes on a dull blue tone. Portra looks better i cool light because it adds some warmth. But slide film might be a better bet for landscapes. I quite like Provia 100F because it's sharp and contrasty and can be saturated quite a lot in post-processing. It has good colours even in overcast light.

    I don't have any landscape photos with Ektar but the first one below was taken on an overcast day in May and the second on a very sunny day in July. It almost looks like a different film to me.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Minolta X-700 + MD 28-85 at macro setting

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    Minolta X-700 + MC 50/1.4
    Last edited by Jaf-Photo; 02-24-2014 at 12:44 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6

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    That’s true of any 5500K daylight color film used in open shade or overcast conditions.


    We can use one of the 81 series warming filters to absorb the excess blue of the light before it reaches the film so that the colors will be recorded with reasonably accuracy.
    Last edited by Ian C; 02-24-2014 at 12:48 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #7

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    Here is one that's borrowed from my gallery entries, there is at least one other there which is Ektar on a misty grey day.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails birch.jpg  

  8. #8

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    I've posted on this topic many times already. You can do a search. Here it's foggy much of the time. If the fog is soft and enveloping it acts much like a softbox and the light will tend to be quite white. No issues. But when the fog lifts or there is just general bluish overcast, you'll
    need an 81A filter to get all the dye layers correctly exposed. Makes a huge difference when you go to print.

  9. #9

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    ... and contrary to a previous post, Ektar prints wonderfully in the darkroom - no more difficult than any other color neg film. But it is a little more fussy in terms of correct exposure and color balancing to begin with. That's completely to be expected with a higher-contrast, higher-saturation product. And that's why you especially need warming filters in overcast situations, or in shade under open blue skies. You can't retrieve color information that isn't obtained on the film to begin with, regardless of whether you're scanning or printing in the darkroom.

  10. #10
    MattKing's Avatar
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    This is Ektar in mottled light. But you should understand that the scanning or optical printing process that intervenes makes any "example" print as much about the intervening process as it is about the film.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 15a-2013-09-21.jpg  
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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