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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by psvensson
    Ron Mowrey, ex-Kodak, sez RA-RT replenisher works fine for room-temp. development. Time is around 2 mins. I use Patterson's Photocolor chemistry in trays. Works very well, except that the stated times are too short - extend by 50% for better print-to-print consistency. The diluted developer lasts a very long time without replenishment.
    I also use patterson RA4 printmaster at room temp. It lasts pretty much forever. Just last night I developed some prints in RA4 chems that has been unused for more than one month and they all look fine. The original developer was mixed early December 2004 and has been replenished 2 times since then.

    I've been replenishing the developer as required to make up volume.

    Graham.

  2. #12

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    Sorry if this has been answered before or if it is something that every competent photographer should know, but what is involved with replenishment? What is the proper way of replenishing solution? Does it depend on how much a particular solution has processed, how old it is, how much solution has evaporated or sloshed out of the tray during processing, or a combination of all or some of the above? Also, once a solution has been replenished, must it then be discarded, or can it be replenished multiple times. When I was taught how to process B&W, I was told to buy HC-110, because it was cheap and replenishing something like D-76 would be a "pain in the ass" along with shifts in consistency from before to after replenishment. Granted this was for film development which I am much more reluctant to replenish for than something as unimportant as a single piece of paper here and there, but is there any truth to the difficulty of determining the proper rate of replenishment?

    Regards.
    ~Karl Borowski

  3. #13

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    I replenish bleach and fix for C-41. After each batch I remove so much of the old solution. Exact amount varies with the amount of film and the chemicals used. IIRC my bleach is considered low replenishment so very little bleach gets replaced every batch. OTOH I remove more fixer per batch. I then replace that amount with replenisher. You'd do something similar with paper but you'd keep track of the amount of paper instead of the amount of film.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by FilmIs4Ever
    Sorry if this has been answered before or if it is something that every competent photographer should know, but what is involved with replenishment? What is the proper way of replenishing solution? Does it depend on how much a particular solution has processed, how old it is, how much solution has evaporated or sloshed out of the tray during processing, or a combination of all or some of the above? Also, once a solution has been replenished, must it then be discarded, or can it be replenished multiple times. When I was taught how to process B&W, I was told to buy HC-110, because it was cheap and replenishing something like D-76 would be a "pain in the ass" along with shifts in consistency from before to after replenishment. Granted this was for film development which I am much more reluctant to replenish for than something as unimportant as a single piece of paper here and there, but is there any truth to the difficulty of determining the proper rate of replenishment?

    Regards.
    ~Karl Borowski
    I don't think there is a single correct answer to this question in B&W or colour.

    The obvious answer is to follow the manufacturers recommendation, which will normally state so many ml replenisher for each film or sheet of 10x8 paper. Replenisher itself may be a normal strength working solution or something much weaker, whatever it is will be disclosed in the data sheet from the manufacturer.

    I tend to take note of the manufacturer recommendations and then once a solution is supposed to be getting exhausted watch carefully for signs of exhaustion. If I see an indication of exhaustion, I replenish :-)

    I also look for missing solution, if I mixed 600ml originally (which would fill a bottle to the top, and now I'm down to 500 ml, I'll mix another 100ml of working strength solution and add it to the old so thatI continue to deprive the solution oxygen when I bottle it.

    I do use a propane/butane squirt (cigarette lighter fluid) in every bottle before I close it to remove the oxygen, which helps a lot with longevity of developers.

    Some metrics for you. I'm still using patterson RA4 dev originally mixed in November 2004, replenished 3 times to make up volume. The Patterson Bleach-Fix has been replenished once to make up volume. I have not once replenished because the chemistry is showing signs of exhaustion. I use this chemistry at room temperature (~24C)

    I use Agfa C41 colour kits typically for 8 x 120 films rather than the 5 x 120 that they state. The kits easily last 4 months from mixing as long as they are stored back in airtight bottles after each roll of film.


    Graham.

  5. #15

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    Psvensson: How much does a supply of Paterson's photocolor cost you? I've heard good things about this brand before.

    With regard to replenishment, in addition to adding a certain amount of fresh developer, do you also have to take out a certain amount of used developer? Can replenishment of a given solution continue ad infinitum or is there a limit to the number of replenishments a given solution can endure?

    Regards.
    ~Karl Borowski

  6. #16

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    Ya you pull out old solution which would be full of things from the film/paper processed.

    How much effort are you willing to put into making sure your process is in control? If you're willing to jump all the hurdles then I bet you can keep replenishing forever. Go to the Kodak website and see if the info on process control is still there. I'm not sure it makes that much sense for the average person. Better to dump the stuff every so often but if you're doing processing every single day then maybe you want to stock control strips and get a densitomer.

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