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  1. #1

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    Color grade thermometer

    I am starting to get back into color processing (C41 and E6) and I need a really reliable thermometer for this. I have a $4 glass thermometer that I bought at Freestyle which yields my body temperature to within a degree C and that's been good enough for my black and white work. I also have a fancier Premier Large Dial thermometer, but it disagrees with the glass thermometer by a degree or two (C or F I can't remember). Any way, these thermometers are both a little difficult to calibrate since their range does not cover the ice or boiling water temperatures (standard lab calibrators).

    My question: Can anyone recommend a reliable thermometer for color work which I can use for color and to better understand my existing thermometers and derive corrections for them. I don't care if it's metal or glass. There is one being sold by Patterson called the "12-Inch Color Thermometer", priced from about $25-30. I was thinking of this one, but I'd love to hear other users experiences. I know Patterson is a pretty serious company that usually makes good equipment. I have one other related question: does anyone use "aquarium heaters" to warm C41 chemicals. I have an Arista C41 kit that wants the developer held at 102 F, so elevating the temperature of a water heat bath in contact with the various chemical tanks in a thermostatically controlled way seems to be a good approach.
    Last edited by davela; 03-03-2014 at 01:46 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2

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    Kodak Process thermometer. Aquarium heaters a bit dicey. Try to acquire a Jobo tempering box or something like that. A true thermoregulator
    is better, but expensive.

  3. #3

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    I never cared for dial thermometers. Notoriously inaccurate, IMO.

  4. #4
    AgX
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    A clinical digital thermomether, is higly calibrated, cheap and often waterproof.

    Disadvantages:
    -) it holds the maximum measured value
    -) to be used with a vague, simple thermometer to temper into the limited range of the clinical one

  5. #5

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    Body thermometers, mercury ones if possible. Highly accurate and shot tenths of degrees easily. Plus their resolution is between some 35 and 45 degrees, perfect for color processing. I have 4 of them in my darkroom.

  6. #6
    jcc
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    I use a digital meat thermometer. I stick the probe in the bath or directly into the chem bottles, and have the readout somewhere safe and dry. Cheap, sensitive, responsive, and it works.

  7. #7
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    What Drew said. The Kodak Type 3 Process mercury thermometer. Catalog #106-4955. Highly prized and sought after. Usually around $50, used.

    Here's a current offering on the ugly auction site. (I have no affiliation with the seller.)

    Short of spending multiple hundreds of dollars on a new calibrated lab-grade instrument, the Type 3 is as good as it gets. I use mine to calibrate all other thermometers in my darkroom, including my Hass Intellifaucet.

    [Edit: Added the catalog number from the pictured box for future reference after the above auction ends.]

    Ken
    Last edited by Ken Nadvornick; 03-03-2014 at 03:06 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Added [Edit]...
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  8. #8

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    I have both a mercury thermometer and a Kodak Digital one which I have had for upwards of 20 years. Both correspond with each other with regard to temp readings and I have had no experience of faulty developing of any material so I must presume they are both accurate. A degree or so either way will not make one jot of difference so long as you know that there is a difference., then allow for it. They used to say a colour thermometer had to be accurate to +/- 1/4 degree but this just isn't so as long as you are aware if there is a discrepancy.

  9. #9

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    Note that the Kodak Process Thermometer is illegal to ship via USPS -- all that mercury. If your seller does ship it that way, they should be sure it is packed so it doesn't break, and is in several well-sealed plastic bags. If it breaks and drips mercury out a corner of the box, they will be in a whole lot of legal pain…

    It's my calibration reference.

  10. #10
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Paterson certified colour thermometer http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...mometer_9.html
    Ben

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