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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    I've made internegs with Kodak 4x5 interneg film. Some amazing results. But sometimes I had to struggle with a magenta/green color crossover. I did it in an enlarger.
    Did you use "commercial internegative 4325" film? I'd be interested in the filtration and times you used, as well as the lens and bulb power.

  2. #22
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    It's been a while

    Quote Originally Posted by darkroom_rookie View Post
    Did you use "commercial internegative 4325" film? I'd be interested in the filtration and times you used, as well as the lens and bulb power.
    Let me do some research to see if I have notes on what I did. What I do remember is the stuff is tungsten balanced and slow like RA paper.

    Best,
    Don
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  3. #23
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Balancing colour interneg film would shift from one workstation to another, I used the density difference method which do not ask me to explain as I forget. Also we used a graduated grey background image once we were dialed in close. The cross curves would show themseles visually by eye from the highlight to the shadow and one would do a final correction based on this very subtle approach.
    Also the best internegs are those that are done by contacting the source film to the interneg film emulsion to emulsion .

    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    Let me do some research to see if I have notes on what I did. What I do remember is the stuff is tungsten balanced and slow like RA paper.

    Best,
    Don

  4. #24

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    The best internegative film currently on the market would appear to be Portra 160. I've done some tentative experiments with it, but have all
    the fine-tuning yet to go (low priority on my current schedule). Basically, you're on your own. To make high-quality printable internegs from
    slides, you also need to become proficient at contrast masking first. This is all an advanced skill set, and you're on your own. Don't expect to
    find anything serious in print or on the web. I don't really think anyone has pinned it down yet with current materials.

  5. #25
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Here are the curves of the "real" internegative film. If you do not balance and expose properly, you get crossover due to the upsweep on the right of the curve. Regular Portra has no upsweep, but is straight with a shoulder and that is why use a just a tad of pull process. Stay off the shoulder of Portra 160.

    The left photo "Birds of a Feather" was made on Portra from a 35mm Kodachrome, and the right one "Tower Rock" was made from an Ektachrome original. Both are about 2" x 3" on 4x5 Portra and used the exposure and process described above. The photos strained the upload, but I made it. The Kodachrome is just too contrasty for me. No Kodachrome has turned out as well as I wanted, but the Ektachromes were just fine.

    PE
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Interneg-birds of a feather front.jpg   Internegative film curve.jpg   Interneg-tower rock.jpg  
    Last edited by Photo Engineer; 03-10-2014 at 04:57 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Changed to pull process for clarity.

  6. #26

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    if making 35mm internegatives, does anyone have any experience using ECN-2 movie film? I would have thought the lower contrast might make it suitable.

  7. #27
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    ECN is NOT NOT NOT designed for making internegatives this way due to contrast issues. It will generally not make good prints.

    PE

  8. #28

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    I managed to peg even a highly contrasty Velvia image or two with a Portra interneg. ... But it was a chore! Basically, I made the interneg from
    a master reduced-contrast dupe intended for Ciba printing rather than the original neg itself! That involved multiple masks in the first place.
    Yet because it was all done 8x10 contact, each step, even the final 30x40 print came out rather crisp. But color balance was luck of the draw. Never accurate, but sometimes nonetheless attractive. And the tonality was excellent, which would certainly not be the case with a direct
    interneg of any type; So unless I make some quantum leap myself, I wouldn't really recommend Velvia as the best candidate for internegs on Porta. E100G or old-school Ektachromes, maybe.

  9. #29
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    I should add that I also have a "Reverser", well two actually, that fit on my Nikons. These allow the use of 35mm film for making internegs a roll at a time. I use a white card outdoors and meter for the f32 aperture of the Reverser and then shoot away, one slide at a time.

    They are just as good, but a tad grainier due to size.

    PE

  10. #30
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    I should add that I also have a "Reverser", well two actually, that fit on my Nikons. These allow the use of 35mm film for making internegs a roll at a time. I use a white card outdoors and meter for the f32 aperture of the Reverser and then shoot away, one slide at a time.

    They are just as good, but a tad grainier due to size.

    PE
    I've wondered about that, if we could just get one of those camera gadgets designed back in the day for slide uping and shoot copies of our slides on negative film - if contrast builds one could even pre-flash a little. Is that what you're talking about?

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