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  1. #1
    bvy
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    Making Internegatives - Which is better?

    Understanding there will be a tradeoff either way, I'm wondering which of the two would be better for making internegatives from slides:
    1. Using expired dedicated internegative film, reputed to be kept cold-stored since purchased. (I'm looking both at Kodak Vericolor sheet film, and Fujicolor IT-N roll film.)
    2. Using fresh Portra 160 (or equivalent), using the pull method (i.e. overexpose slightly then pull during development).

    Thoughts?

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    The Portra should be more consistent I should think? A stable, fresh product, stored in a known way since new - and most likely repeatable for others too.

    Somewhere here there is a thread where someone (PhotoEngineer?) suggested a starting point for a small amount of filtration for exposing the interneg, but that would also depend on the original transparency and the light-source. My memory has faded over the exact procedure of what I (infrequently) did thirty years ago unfortunately. It would be very useful if you recorded your progress with either method of course! Good luck
    Last edited by MartinP; 03-09-2014 at 05:54 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo

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    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Kodak recommends #2, Portra and I have used it exclusively since the demise of Interneg film. I overexpose and pull process as recommended using either 2' 45" or 3' instead of the 3'. I use a 100C and 50 M on my enlarger with an f22 aperture and 1/2" exposure to get the appearance of "daylight" with my system.

    PE

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    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    I've been meaning to ask this same question myself, but with a third option: How about paper RA-4 as an interneg and then contact-print?
    I know the Crystal Archive that I've got right now has 'FUJIFILM' printed all over the back which might come out in a contact print, but surely there's some brand of RA4 without backprinting?
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

    f/64 and be there.

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    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Using paper, the interneg will be very unsharp!

    PE

  6. #6
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    Making Internegatives - Which is better?

    I also don't think there is any RA4 paper without back printing. There's another thread here about this and shooting RA4 paper in LF cameras then inverting (or not) in...ah, verboten post exposure methods.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  7. #7
    bvy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Kodak recommends #2, Portra and I have used it exclusively since the demise of Interneg film. I overexpose and pull process as recommended using either 2' 45" or 3' instead of the 3'. I use a 100C and 50 M on my enlarger with an f22 aperture and 1/2" exposure to get the appearance of "daylight" with my system.
    Awesome. Thank you. So that exposure works for you for most slides. Interesting. I would have thought each one would have to be tested at various exposures, kind of like making a print.

    Do you have an example of a print made using this method that you'd be willing to share?

  8. #8
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvy View Post
    Awesome. Thank you. So that exposure works for you for most slides. Interesting. I would have thought each one would have to be tested at various exposures, kind of like making a print.

    Do you have an example of a print made using this method that you'd be willing to share?
    And...are those contact printed onto the film or projected? Any advantage one way or the other? Sheet film is easier to handle but given the price of Potra in sheets that's an advantage for contact printing, if you are going to make very many anyway.

  9. #9
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    I also don't think there is any RA4 paper without back printing. There's another thread here about this and shooting RA4 paper in LF cameras then inverting (or not) in...ah, verboten post exposure methods.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Post exposure using anything you can use in the darkroom is permitted AFAIK. So, color balance, density, and etc, is OK.

    PE

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvy View Post
    Awesome. Thank you. So that exposure works for you for most slides. Interesting. I would have thought each one would have to be tested at various exposures, kind of like making a print.

    Do you have an example of a print made using this method that you'd be willing to share?
    Sorry, no uploads right now. The files are huge being 4x5s so I have to reduce the size before I can upload. Some of them are 20M or larger.

    I've done Kodachromes and Ektachromes this way. They are a tad high in contrast due to the lack of the upsweft shoulder that true Interneg film had. Otherwise they are quite good. Better than old interneg film!!!! It did not keep all that well.

    PE

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