Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,914   Posts: 1,556,273   Online: 835
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 23 of 23
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    22
    Here are some pics which may illustrate my problem.

    It seems like I have no contrast in the shots. Developing issue or me just being the worst photographer/developer in history?

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Screen Shot 2014-03-20 at 16.43.32.jpg 
Views:	7 
Size:	388.1 KB 
ID:	84803Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Screen Shot 2014-03-20 at 16.43.42.jpg 
Views:	7 
Size:	541.2 KB 
ID:	84804
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Screen Shot 2014-03-20 at 07.50.03.jpg   Screen Shot 2014-03-20 at 16.42.16.jpg   Screen Shot 2014-03-20 at 16.42.38.jpg  

  2. #22
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,577
    Images
    60
    Well ...

    The Top example looks like it was shot in the fog, which will generally be low in contrast.

    And the second example is probably under-exposed.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #23
    Rudeofus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,695
    Images
    10
    Correctly developed negative film has a lot less contrast than the original scene, and the scanning/printing step restores the original contrast. This is a good thing, because it gives us plenty of dynamic range on the film, although the material can barely cover a density range of 2-3, but scanners really struggle with this low contrast and create lots of extra noise. And since most scanners make some attempt at auto contrast, you can not judge negative contrast from the scans unless you use the densitometer function of your scanner software.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin