Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,899   Posts: 1,584,382   Online: 797
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 39
  1. #11
    dehk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    W Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    888
    Welcome to the club! Been there done that too! Don't feel too bad.
    - Derek
    [ Insert meaningless camera listing here ]

  2. #12
    flash26c's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    108
    Does this mean that we all have to come clean -----disaster!

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Ogden, Utah USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,335
    Quote Originally Posted by Xmas View Post
    check the rewind knob turns as you shoot the blank frames.

    If it does not turn immediately you have a miss load.

    If you get a bottom loader Leica, Zorki or Fed you will get lots of miss loads.

    Noel

    actually, if you get a bottom loader leica-type camera you will have a mis-load once, and after that you learn how to avoid them.

    Don't sweat -- everyone messes up this way once in a while. Always check that rewind knob, always stop winding when the camera tells you you are at the end, learn how the camera feels when it is working right, and your goofs like this will be few and far between.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    California desert
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    955

    story

    "Way back when" in the film era I worked for an international wire service. If you were in California and wanted a photo that was taken in Russia in a hurry, you used a wire service -- no Internet in those days. Well, the guy running the domestic (US) wire network got on the phone to the news photo bureau in Seattle, WA and asked the guy when a photo of a professional ball game played earlier that day was going to be ready to transmit on the wire. The Seattle team was playing a New York team. After a long delay the Seattle guy admitted there would be no game photos that day. The reason was, he said "the door fell off the darkroom."
    Stuff happens. Don't worry about it.

  5. #15
    dances_w_clouds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Vancouver B.C. Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,261
    Images
    45
    Just think of it as your first sacrifice to the photography gods. It does not end with 1 anyway. In photography some things are done by trial and error. There are probably thousands of new rolls made everyday. ;o)

  6. #16
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,078
    Quote Originally Posted by Xmas View Post
    Then close back then check the rewind knob turns as you shoot the blank frames.
    Some cameras have an indicator for the rewind action (asside of the feel at the crank). It is a mark on a rotating rewind release, geared to the sprocket gear.
    By looking at this indicator whilst rewinding one can exclude the case of film torn off the cartrige spool.

  7. #17
    fotch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    SE WI- USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,229
    Oops!
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  8. #18
    yurisrey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New York Metro Area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    260
    Quote Originally Posted by girlafraid View Post
    I've just had my first big film disaster.

    I'm so angry with myself and I'm desperate for it not to happen again. I've never had a film that couldn't be developed in the 3 years since I quite digital. Of course it had to be a precious roll too. It was due to a catalogue of errors which started with me forgetting to zero the image counter when I loaded the film. As for what went wrong after that I'm guessing either it somehow got caught or I went past the point it needed to be rewound if not both. Anyway the film completely came out of the cassette. I did get it out in as dark a room as I could but clearly it got exposed. To be honest I think I knew it was ruined but I just couldn't let go of the hope something had survived so I sent it off. A completely blank film was returned. I know the best thing to do would have been to take the whole camera into a camera shop or such like but that wasn't really possible.

    I never want this to happen again. What is the best way to deal with this situation or tips to stop it happening? Or just reassurance I'm not a complete idiot for letting this happen!

    I kind of hated film for the next few days! As someone who has lost countless digital shots I always had a certain sense of smugness that now all my photos are safely in a draw. Not these though.

    Just some info -
    35mm film
    Zenit e camera
    just out of curiosity, what type of film were you using and where did you get it developed? (eg: pro lab or store.) If it wasn't a pro lab it may indicate that you may have not done anything wrong. Just going out on a hunch about receiving a completely blank roll and saying that the film had left the cassette: perhaps standard B&W put in to C-41 chemistry? If it was color film or B&W C-41 process, forget about this post altogether. Also, a little trick: when you load the film use the rewind knob so your film has a bit of tension-this way you can see that the film is advancing.
    "The real work was thinking, just thinking." - Charles Chaplin

  9. #19
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    7,205
    Quote Originally Posted by girlafraid View Post
    I've just had my first big film disaster.

    I'm so angry with myself and I'm desperate for it not to happen again. I've never had a film that couldn't be developed in the 3 years since I quite digital. Of course it had to be a precious roll too. It was due to a catalogue of errors which started with me forgetting to zero the image counter when I loaded the film. As for what went wrong after that I'm guessing either it somehow got caught or I went past the point it needed to be rewound if not both. Anyway the film completely came out of the cassette. I did get it out in as dark a room as I could but clearly it got exposed. To be honest I think I knew it was ruined but I just couldn't let go of the hope something had survived so I sent it off. A completely blank film was returned. I know the best thing to do would have been to take the whole camera into a camera shop or such like but that wasn't really possible.

    I never want this to happen again. What is the best way to deal with this situation or tips to stop it happening? Or just reassurance I'm not a complete idiot for letting this happen!

    I kind of hated film for the next few days! As someone who has lost countless digital shots I always had a certain sense of smugness that now all my photos are safely in a draw. Not these though.

    Just some info -
    35mm film
    Zenit e camera
    This once happened to me the film came out of the cassette while I was shooting a wedding as the official photographer, so I can sympathise with you, ever since that day I never take more than 33 exposures on a 36 exposure film and it's never happened again in more than 20 years to me, so it does work.
    Ben

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Mission Viejo, California
    Shooter
    127 Format
    Posts
    1,490
    It doesn't hurt to own a simple dark bag, even if you don't develop or load your own film. There is always that time when you have to open your camera in the dark and you'll will be happy when you are prepared.
    - Bill Lynch

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin