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  1. #1

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    What Happens When Part C of C-41 Developer is Bad?

    As we all know, the part C (dark liquid) of the C-41 developer goes bad quickly. What would happen to the film when part C goes bad?

    I used some old chemical to develop a roll of unknown film and the film has wrong color. Not sure if this is related to the bad part C.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2

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    Mostly, nothing would happen. Meaning the developer is dead. Parts A and B are alkaline, preservative and other gadgetry, C should be CD4 - the actual developing agent. And once that kicks the bucket, all bets are off.

  3. #3
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Part C, when good, is yellow to tea colored. If it is brown or tarry it is bad. If it is bad, bad color and contrast result or there is no image at all.

    After all, it is the developing agent.

    PE

  4. #4

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    So, what you think about the two photos shown here? Thx.

  5. #5
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    Bad developer!

  6. #6
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Part C, when good, is yellow to tea colored. If it is brown or tarry it is bad. If it is bad, bad color and contrast result or there is no image at all.

    After all, it is the developing agent.

    PE
    I did read somewhere that even if dark (not completely black) that 'C' should still be good (i.e., defects not noticeable in the process). How true this is I do not know but I have mixed (Flexicolor) dark 'C' with the 'A' and 'B' to make a completely viable developer that I had no problems with. Cannot be more definitive than that reading and experience. The "C' is, by far, the most vulnerable. Treat it with care. - David Lyga

  7. #7
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    Was the temperature correct?

  8. #8
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    David, I would not use it if it were more brown than a good cup of tea!

    PE

  9. #9

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    The part C bottle I have looks like dark coffee. I may just want to try it with a section of my test film....
    The first time I mixed the developer, I mixed it with room temperature water. This time, I should use warmer water...

  10. #10
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Between 20 and 40 C, the mixing temp is not important really. The use temp is critical as is the quality of the chemicals.

    That is the bottom line.

    PE

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