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  1. #1

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    Water Marks from Stabilizer

    At the end of the film processing, I soak the film in stabilizer fluid (in an unused small tank). Then I took out the film and dry it with the clips.

    When the film is drying, I can see some water marks on the top surface (not emulsion) side. Not sure if the marks would show in film scan.

    Would distilled water make the water marks go away? If so, should I use distilled water for all chemical mixture, or just the stabilizer?

    I did not have the same problem with photo-flo for BW film.

    I use Jobo to process films.

  2. #2
    wildbill's Avatar
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    I think you've answered you own question.
    The final rinse of any film process should always use distilled water.
    I mix everything but bleach and fix with distilled when doing color work. City water.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildbill View Post
    I think you've answered you own question.
    The final rinse of any film process should always use distilled water.
    I mix everything but bleach and fix with distilled when doing color work. City water.
    The final bath should be STAB, or you lose its bactericidal/fungicidal action, but yes, the STAB must absolutely be mixed with deionized water. I see no reason why any of the previous soups should be mixed with deionized water, unless your tap water is absolutely terrible. I have made the observation that these white spots look nasty in reflected light but have no impact in light going through the film, i.e. they rarely show up in scans, during enlargement or projection. If you feel like they absolutely have to go away, do the bleach/fix/BLIX step again, then after a thorough wash dilute your STAB 1+4 with deionized water, add a dash of Formalin for good measure and rinse again.

    The best final rinse I ever made was a good dash of Formalin and a tiny tiny tiny amount of Ilfotol wetting agent in deionized water. The amount of wetting agent was so small that the soup didn't even foam when I shook it, but those negs were the cleanest ones I ever had.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  4. #4
    JOR
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    Drying colour fim without marks

    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    The final bath should be STAB, or you lose its bactericidal/fungicidal action, but yes, the STAB must absolutely be mixed with deionized water.
    During the sixties and seventies I processed tens of thousands of rolls of E3, E4 and E6 film using unmodified Kodak stabiliser in 3-gallon hand tank kits and bulk packs for rail-and-carriage machines, always diluted with filtered (but not deionised) London water. I never had any problems with drying marks but I paid particular attention to the drying cycle, which must not be rushed. For film in spirals I placed dry top clips in the drying cabinet. The stabiliser solution was in a tank by the drying cabinet. I attached bottom clips to the film and used it draw the film out of the spiral. Then I passed the looped film through the stabiliser, taking care to avoid creating froth, and hung it from the dry top clip. I let the last film to be dried drip dry for at least fifteen minutes before turning on the warm air. Froth, particularly on the back of 35mm film, is the enemy. If you don't have a drying cabinet, don't worry - drying will just take a little longer. Note that, in the procedure above, the spiral was not contaminated by immersion in stabiliser, so it's nice and clean for the next time. Yes,the film was only immersed in the stabiliser for a few seconds. No, image permanence was not impaired - I have numerous family photos of that era, stored in polyester sleeves, that have neither faded nor grown fungus.

  5. #5
    mts
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    I have always found some drying spots even when using distilled water to formulate stabilizer. The answer seems to be not to leave water droplets on the film. I use photo sponges to wipe the film before drying and have no problems. The sponges must be kept free of grit and wet with stabilizer before wiping. You may not find wiping to your liking, but it does work.
    By denying the facts, any paradox can be sustained--Galileo

  6. #6
    ziyanglai
    Hey everyone.. This will be a 50% response and 50% question.. I always use photo flo after the final rinse, so I never had a uneven drying problem.. But lately I've been thinking about stopping to use photo flo. So like the few responses above, would distilled water work like photo flo? Thanks.


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    Quote Originally Posted by ziyanglai View Post
    Hey everyone.. This will be a 50% response and 50% question.. I always use photo flo after the final rinse, so I never had a uneven drying problem.. But lately I've been thinking about stopping to use photo flo. So like the few responses above, would distilled water work like photo flo? Thanks.


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  8. #8

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    A drop of Kodak Photo Flo in the final mix, along with clean water in the chemistry in the first place.I don't see how there can be any other answer.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    A drop of Kodak Photo Flo in the final mix, along with clean water in the chemistry in the first place.I don't see how there can be any other answer.
    To every problem there exists a solution which is simple, easy to understand, and wrong. C41 uses a bactericide/fungicide in its final rinse, and if you wash that away with your suggested final rinse,you may see your film eaten away by bacteria/fungus after some time.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  10. #10

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    The C-41 stabilizer is supposed to do what photo-flo does. I have no problem with photo-flo with BW film, but the C-41 stabilizer.

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