Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,550   Posts: 1,544,787   Online: 1030
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
  1. #1
    ziyanglai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Chandler, AZ
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    158
    Images
    1

    RVP 50 and RVP 100 long exposure color shift?

    Hello everyone, I did a 25 minute exposure a days ago WITHOUT any color correcting filters at all on RVP 100. When I got my film back from the lab, the colors shifted purple (Just on the long exposure shot, nothing else. The lab processed the film correctly, new film).

    I just read on on Fuji's data sheet and various sites that when shooting on RVP 50 (not 100), and when doing long exposures, you'll need a magenta color correcting filter.

    So when doing long exposures, the colors on RVP 50 shifts green and on RVP 100, it shifts purple?

    Can someone verify this? I have shot both 50 and 100, but have never done long exposures on RVP 50. I would like to know if it will shift green.

    Thanks everyone.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    wildbill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Grand Rapids
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,416
    Images
    140
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  3. #3
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SE Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,580
    Images
    15
    Yes Velvia 100 shifts to a strong magenta cast unlike Velvia 50 which turns an ethereal green. The 100 version of that film is a bit too over-saturated for most photographers' use and is not easily tamed for long exposures. For very long exposures Provia 100F would be a better choice.

    If you are doing long exposures with RVP50 even a magenta filter will not entirely cancel out the cast because of the film's poor reciprocity (contrast will also increase dramatically). The green cast can be especially creative for night scenes.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  4. #4
    ziyanglai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Chandler, AZ
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    158
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Yes Velvia 100 shifts to a strong magenta cast unlike Velvia 50 which turns an ethereal green. The 100 version of that film is a bit too over-saturated for most photographers' use and is not easily tamed for long exposures. For very long exposures Provia 100F would be a better choice.

    If you are doing long exposures with RVP50 even a magenta filter will not entirely cancel out the cast because of the film's poor reciprocity (contrast will also increase dramatically). The green cast can be especially creative for night scenes.
    Thanks for your clarification.. I just feel like it's weird.. Aren't they both made from the same formula? Just better reciprocity failure and extra stop of light?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SE Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,580
    Images
    15
    RVP 50 and 100 share a baseline palette but 100 is much more enriched, particularly in the red spectrum, and contrast is a known issue. My own experience is that the whites while being very clean, will wash out very easily and thus exposure needs a bit more care than RVP 50.

    Provia 100F is not the same formula as the Velvias (related: Velvia 100F is not the same formula as either RVP 50 or 100); it has better contrast, reciprocity and a more neutral palette that makes it suitable for people (portraiture) among many other applications where the traditional saturated Velvias can make people look like they've been sitting in front of the microwave. But despite its encouraging credentials, Provia 100F will also turn a surrealist purple over long exposures. I routinely push Provia 100F to the max for star trails, running it for between 4 and 6 hours. I do not filter this: the strong magenta cast is desirable but not essential; other people use tungsten film to render the skies blue (at night...) or cross process Velvia 50 in C41 for an altogether wierd and other-worldly effect. Your choice!

    Provia 100F and both Velvias scan quite easily and well, but Velvia 100F is a challenge because of its quirky palette (chiefly mustard undertones and brownish reds, flat greens).
    Last edited by Poisson Du Jour; 05-18-2014 at 10:50 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  6. #6
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,335
    Images
    225

    RVP 50 and RVP 100 long exposure color shift?

    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    RVP 50 and 100 share a baseline palette but 100 is much more enriched, particularly in the red spectrum, and contrast is a known issue. My own experience is that the whites while being very clean, will wash out very easily and thus exposure needs a bit more care than RVP 50.

    Provia 100F is not the same formula as the Velvias (related: Velvia 100F is not the same formula as either RVP 50 or 100); it has better contrast, reciprocity and a more neutral palette that makes it suitable for people (portraiture) among many other applications where the traditional saturated Velvias can make people look like they've been sitting in front of the microwave. But despite its encouraging credentials, Provia 100F will also turn a surrealist purple over long exposures. I routinely push Provia 100F to the max for star trails, running it for between 4 and 6 hours. I do not filter this: the strong magenta cast is desirable but not essential; other people use tungsten film to render the skies blue (at night...) or cross process Velvia 50 in C41 for an altogether wierd and other-worldly effect. Your choice!

    Provia 100F and both Velvias scan quite easily and well, but Velvia 100F is a challenge because of its quirky palette (chiefly mustard undertones and brownish reds, flat greens).
    Velvia100f is also discontinued

    But your info was really great stuff. I've only done exposures up to 4-5 minutes with Velvia50 and never had any green cast, in fact they all seemed to stay in the red/magenta spectrum...

    I've always used a polarizing filter for my long exposures with Velvia50, would this perhaps have helped tame the green somehow and that's why I haven't seen the green? Or was it that 2-5 minutes wasn't long enough to see the shift?
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  7. #7
    Athiril's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,533
    Images
    28
    It's a shame, Astia was really good for this.

  8. #8
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SE Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,580
    Images
    15
    StoneNYC I have made exposures to 8 minutes on RVP50 (EOS 1N) in falling light to darkness with no casting. But exposures on Provia 100F have been 6 hours for star trails which will really bring out the magenta cast; one is free to take it or leave it, as it can easily be tidied up in post. I have never thought of Velvia 50 casting green being suitable for star trails.
    Long exposures under a full moon are especially bewitching (that meaning the moment I trip the camera I've locked myself into the car and hiding under the blankets...). To best understand how Velvia 50 and 100 cast, expose them for more than an hour. Do the same with Provia 100F to see the difference. All exposures will be useable irrespective of the cast.

    I don't use any filtration for star trails, though I use a polariser >99% of the time for landscape/scenic work with Velvia 50, so I couldn't say if it holds back casting for exposures in the range of 4-5 minutes.

    Below:
    6 hour exposure on Provia 100F
    Star trails around the South Celestial Pole with
    passage of the International Space Station,
    Victoria River, Cobungra, Victoria January 2013.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	VicRiver_Cobungra_Jan13.jpg 
Views:	41 
Size:	89.2 KB 
ID:	88255


    Below: The same pic with the cast neutralised (we printed this out for a look-see but found it didn't have the WOW-EE! factor to it.)

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	VicRiver_Cobungra_Jan13_Neut.jpg 
Views:	43 
Size:	120.3 KB 
ID:	88256

    The printed image (Kodak Endura Professional metallic) was left as-is with the magenta cast and it enthralls (befuddles?) people: "I didn't know night time was purple!"...
    Last edited by Poisson Du Jour; 05-19-2014 at 12:54 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  9. #9

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    2,831
    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I've always used a polarizing filter for my long exposures with Velvia50, would this perhaps have helped tame the green somehow and that's why I haven't seen the green?
    Only if the filter was cheap, for long exposures I remove my normal uV filter too big a risk of more spurious images, any large filter factor will hurt exposure time a lot.

    You do look at the slide on a light box?

  10. #10
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,335
    Images
    225
    Quote Originally Posted by Xmas View Post
    Only if the filter was cheap, for long exposures I remove my normal uV filter too big a risk of more spurious images, any large filter factor will hurt exposure time a lot.

    You do look at the slide on a light box?
    Yes on a light box, and no not cheap, I use the Nikon ultra slim circular polarizer. It's supposed to be better than the B+W filter (which is the only non-B+W filter I regularly use/own). It's in the $200 range.
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin