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  1. #21

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    It' a one shot kit. Typically my chems have lasted over a year if I purge the bottles after each use ( I use Argon ). My last kit did not last that long, I'm writing it off as a one time problem. I have also bought some glass bottles to pour the concentrates into since the last kit went bad. Hopefully it will help. I have also run two rolls on the same 140ml of chemicals ( same day ). This slightly exceeds the rated capacity of the kit ( 60 rolls for 5L ), but have had good results. Even at only running 35 rolls or so, I'm happy with the cost aspect.

    Joel

    Quote Originally Posted by RedSun View Post
    Is "Tetenal 3 step" a replenish set, or one-shot set? How long would the concentration last after opened?
    Last edited by Joel_L; 06-03-2014 at 11:08 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #22

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    Luckily, I can buy Belgian-made FujiHunt Chrome6X kits at an incredibly low price here at the fringes of Central Europe. I'm currently at my fourth box and each kit paid itself many times, as I developed a huge amount of 4x5 transparencies for several photographers in my Jobo 3010. In fact, the kits bought me a few lenses. For me, home E-6 proved to be fabulous value for money. And seeing hundreds of large format Velvia 50/100F, Provia, Astia and E100G/VS/SW transparencies is an aesthetic joy unto itself.
    But shipping this kit to USA is really expensive.

  3. #23
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    I even went as far as contacting the local Fuji distributor in an effort to find the FujiHunt6X kit here. No go, best she could offer me were the 20L versions of each chem individually, which I wouldn't mind buying as a 'lifetime supply' (except that it wouldn't last a lifetime before it went bad).
    Only place I've seen it is via macodirect, although the shipping makes it a bit more expensive (although still worth the price if I use it up quick enough). Nowhere else online seems to have it that I can find, anyone else know where to get it?
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

  4. #24
    Athiril's Avatar
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    When I did it I was running replenished, which ended up around 60 cents a roll I think in terms of replenishment cost per roll, I think.

  5. #25

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    I, in the other hand, have almost no access to those E6 kits with a reasonable price. So, I am making my own makeshift E6 alternative as we speak. Bleach and fix are from minilab C41 and replenisehd as long as I have access to that minilab, stabilizer is also from there but with added touch of formalin for dye stability and the developer is something I mix from bulk chemicals. I also do ECN2 developing at home and the developer seems pretty close to the E6 one. So far the experiment I ran came out magenta but pH measurment showed me that the developer was at pH 9.4 and I am surprised it still worked. E6 color developer is meant to be pH 11.1, whereas ECN2 is 10.25 and C41 for comparison is 10.0. I c o u l d buffer the solution to 11.1 but that would turn my negatives green. Instead I am going to try alkaline treatment to film before color developer - I'll let you know how that worked out.
    Oh and the first developer? Fuji Papitol, 40 degrees centigrade for 4:30. Any paper developer should work; Papitol also gives nice fine grain.
    And why ECN2 developer, why not the real deal? ECN2 developer is dead easy to mix, the only tricky ingredient is CD3 (same as in E6 and RA4 developers!) but if you are lucky and live in USA, you can get some from Formulary for peanuts, whereas I am in trouble getting it cheaply in EU. You can skip the antifoggant and anti-calcium, just use distilled water. PE might say that the developer goes bad very quickly but I have managed to deplete it before it even had to chance to go bad, kept it maybe for a month and a half.
    Overall, it is quite a hack of a process but hey - I am getting slides and it is not costing me very much.

  6. #26

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    Hi, I'm new here, I'm also interested in E-6 developing at home (have been developing B/W for years). Unfortunately, there's no source for chemicals in my country and I have to order it online. Get away with that issue, I'm wondering what I could invest to start developing color films? I shoot almost 120 roll film only. I'm on budget so mini-lab is not an option. Can I use my rotating base for drum? Thanks.

  7. #27
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by A9tm View Post
    Hi, I'm new here, I'm also interested in E-6 developing at home (have been developing B/W for years). Unfortunately, there's no source for chemicals in my country and I have to order it online. Get away with that issue, I'm wondering what I could invest to start developing color films? I shoot almost 120 roll film only. I'm on budget so mini-lab is not an option. Can I use my rotating base for drum? Thanks.
    Critical to E6 is temperature control. I only started it when I got gifted a Jobo CPE2+Lift, or I wouldn't even think about it.
    Some people get away with just regular inversions and keeping it the rest of the time in a sink full of water with an aquarium heater. But do note that all times (that I've seen) are for continuous rotary jobo-like processing, if you invert-and-wait like for B+W you'll need to adjust times accordingly (by what factor? I don't know). If you can set up a manual-roller in a sinkful of water and keep it constant enough temperature, you might get something decent.
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

  8. #28
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    Oh pshaw. It's easy enough without a Jobo.

    The way I used to do it was this: I'd pour the solutions (temporarily) into well labeled aluminum cans and set them in a big dish pan with water of close to (within a degree or two) the right temperature. The metal conducts the heat. Put your steel film tank in there too. For the first developer, which is the only one that's really critical (the color developer or CD/reversal for three bath, is "semi-critical" and needs to be within a couple of degrees, the rest just go to completion) put your thermometer into the solution and run hot or cold water over the can as needed until the temperature is where it should be. Pour it into your film tank and agitate per instructions, setting the tank in the water bath between agitations. When you're getting ready for the CD you can tweak its temperature the same way in between 1st developer agitations.

    It's a bit of a PITA, granted, compared to warming up my Jobo and just letting it run and pulling the lift handle when the timer goes off then pouring in the next bath, but it's not really difficult and it works fine.

    You don't need to keep a heater in the water bath if it starts out right or no more than a couple of degrees cooler. It will only cool very slightly and the 1st developer in the tank (the only critical one, remember?) will cool even less during the development time. It will be close enough (they say 1/2 degree F but I found a degree wasn't so bad.) Just a hot water tap mixed with cold to the right temperature works fine. The directions give times and they work fine for inversion.

    Don't make it sound harder than it is. It isn't hard, just a bit...busy.
    Last edited by Roger Cole; 06-11-2014 at 01:46 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #29

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    having done more e-6 than I care to remember, I can attest to a few things.

    1: fairly critical temp and chemistry balance. - That is if your running control strips, using a densitometer, and doing this for customers so your process is within kodak limits. The kodak chems used to continually drift cooler with use and replenishment requiring the addition of NaOH solution to keep it balanced. if you went too far, you had to add sulfuric acid solution. 1ml per liter of color developer, per .05cc shift. Never used fuji chems, imagine they are the same.

    2: Doing it yourself - at home - easy. Your not having to thread a needle with the balance.
    If you can do black and white - bake a cake or souffle - or drive a car in rush hour traffic you can do this.

    You should aim for CONSISTENT time, temp, and agitation. You don't have quite the latitude so just don't be sloppy. But you will get lovely images. And if you did not run a control strip, you don't know or care how far "off" from the reference strip you are. You will get decent imaged. And if they seem to get little cooler with chemistry use, add a bit of sodium hydroxide solution to the color developer. if they go a bit too yellow, add some sulphuric acid solution. ( Cant remember how infrequent that was )

    Keep from cross contamination, and you will be happy. You can get quite a bit out of 5 liters, just try and use it all up in a few months, and keep it well sealed or even refrigerated. You will likely have to adjust the first developer times as you use it. That's just like b&w cause it IS. The color developer is less finicky, and the bleach fix and other steps are to completion. Once out of the reversal bath it's light safe. Way back in the day e-3 used light reversal, and e-4 ( and e-5, ea-5, and ar-5) was almost identical but with chemical reversal, differing temps, and pre-hardener. One was considered for "amateur films" and the other for professional and (E-5 variations) aerial films. The e3 and e4 used a rather powerful ferricyanide bleach compared to the edta based one used today. iirc.

    easiest course is just bite the bullet, order it and process. You will be hooked as soon as the trans hits the light box.

  10. #30
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    What Blaine said. I never used mine enough to get a noticeable drift. I'd wait until I had enough film for the listed capacity of 8oz (the smallest amount that would cover the film in my tank that used the least chemicals) which I think was three 36x 35mm rolls (I didn't do 120 or LF in those days) but may have been two, it's been a long time. Then I'd just run one after the other and discard. I bet you could get more by re-using it further and maybe adding the sodium hydroxide he mentions but I didn't know that then.

    It's harder to describe than to do, though plan a practice roll or two. Once you get it, you'll be good.

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