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  1. #31
    Rhodes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blaine.minazzi View Post

    2: Doing it yourself - at home - easy. Your not having to thread a needle with the balance.
    If you can do black and white - bake a cake or souffle - or drive a car in rush hour traffic you can do this.
    No, I can not do black and white, bake a cake and drive my car in rush hour, all at the same time. Mainly do to the fact that my car lack a good oven to bake!


    I develop my E6 at home also, decided to do after seen the costs here to develop a c-41 and a slide film. Since I do love the colours and seeing the positive image after taking out the film from the tank. Use Tetenal 3 bath 1L. It mainly costs me 50 euros (+/-), with shipping cost included. I do not use enough slide film for going to the 5L kits.

  2. #32

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    I temper my chemicals in a 20L plastic bin filled with hot water from tap ('bouts 40 degrees Celsius). They heat up in 5-7 minutes and I start always one degree above the required temperature and prolong the development by 20-40 seconds, much is relied on feel and experience, I don't much care for standards and such. Home processing of pretty much anything is easy if you have common sense and don't mess about. Don't worry, you can do it. You don't need a fancy Jobo or anything like that if you do it just for fun. I'd get a Jobo and proper chemicals if I would be needing repeatable and professional results.
    Bear in mind I have no real E6 chemicals and most of my color processing is motion picture negative but heck, I ended up with some pretty neat slides last time.

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    My routine includes 42-degree paper developer for 4-5 minutes (takes some test strips to learn how the specific developer works and ages after every roll), followed by 3-5 minutes fogging in sunlight (of course, there is a citric acid stop bath and wash in between), then modified ECN2 developer (with added alkali and sodium sulfite) for 6-10 minutes, depending how well seasoned the soup is. Rest of processing is done in C41 back end, bleach time is tripled, fix time is doubled. Stabilizer has formalin added, 40ml of 10% solution. Considering how easy the C41 tail end is to obtain (esp. if you know a minilab clerk/owner) and how ridiculously easy and cheap ECN2 developer is to make - especially if you live in USA, this could be a real alternative to E6. There can be a magenta cast due to the pH being off from E6 standard and the tones might be not right but I am quite happy with the results. You can get rid of the magenta if you soak the film in water with 2 teaspoons of baking soda added per liter but that messes up shadow density a bit but the slide remains scannable and usable. If there is enough interest I might post my recipes and exact routines.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by VPooler View Post
    and how ridiculously easy and cheap ECN2 developer is to make - especially if you live in USA, this could be a real alternative to E6. There can be a magenta cast due to the pH being off from E6 standard and the tones might be not right but I am quite happy with the results. You can get rid of the magenta if you soak the film in water with 2 teaspoons of baking soda added per liter but that messes up shadow density a bit but the slide remains scannable and usable. If there is enough interest I might post my recipes and exact routines.
    Or you could simply mix some E6 recipes which are very close or right at the real formula. See examples of such formulas here and here. You get the rough stuff cheaply from Keten in Poland and the fine stuff from Suvatlar in Germany, both ship at least within EU boundaries.

    It's not cheap, but neither are the film rolls. Color slide film offers an incredibly beautiful color palette, yet might well disappear from the market within the next ten years, if not earlier. It's time we do it justice with the right chemistry.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    Or you could simply mix some E6 recipes which are very close or right at the real formula. See examples of such formulas here and here. You get the rough stuff cheaply from Keten in Poland and the fine stuff from Suvatlar in Germany, both ship at least within EU boundaries.

    It's not cheap, but neither are the film rolls. Color slide film offers an incredibly beautiful color palette, yet might well disappear from the market within the next ten years, if not earlier. It's time we do it justice with the right chemistry.
    Meh, I can't be bothered to buy the extra stuff. I can do both positives and negatives with the same soup and with same degree of success. The method works very well with Ektachrome and Agfa Precisia - the latter cost me some 4,50€ per roll, making it cheaper than Ektar for example.

    Just describing my method, maybe there are some other boneheads here who are interested in both ECN2 and E6 and well now you know that you can use the same extremely cheap and simple developer for both of them.

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