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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by clasbou View Post
    That is exactly what I was talking about : a tray of 35°C water, in which I would put the exposed print (in total dark of course). I would then load the wet print into the wet drum.
    Why pre-wetting in a drum, as you all do, would be different from pre-wetting in a same-temp water bath ? Shouldn't the physical effect on the paper be the same ?
    And why loading a wet paper into a wet drum should have any effect on the paper ? If both have a layer of water on it, when they come into contact, why should it produce any effect ?
    Thanks for your help.
    Now I see what you trying to do.

    Sure you can pre-wet the print in the tray, but there is absolutely no need for it. The purpose of pre-soaking is to get the paper and drum in the same temperature of the processor bath. Also, the top protective layer would be washed away and expose the real RA emulsion for processing. By pre-soaking in the tray, the print and drums are still in different temperature of the processing bath.

    Then you run into other logistic problems. Your pre-soaking tray will be full of stained water. On the processor, the soaking water would be dumped.... And there are many more problems.... It is very hard to get quality control of this....

  2. #12

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    Presoaking in a tray is doable, but I'm sure it will be painfully messy. My process is simple - rinse the drum, a quick wipe with a hand-towel, and load it with a new sheet of paper. Just make sure you start your processing with a quick water rinse to wet the whole sheet of paper and bring it to the temperature. If there are a few drops of water left over in the drum, most of the time it's not a problem at all. Some times I get lazy and don't bother with wiping the drum at all - load it when it's wet. As long as you pre-wet before developer it really should not be a problem.

  3. #13
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Pre wetting colour prints was the way I learned how to colour print at College. Each student shared a private room with Chromega Enlarger , and a small sink to the side which housed a K16 colour processor. the colour print was placed face down on a net with tempered water to process and when ready the whole net was brought over the spinning drum and the chemicals was added, very efficient and repeatable . We dried our prints in a huge hot air dryer. This was a fantastic process room and very doable for the home printer wanting to print colour negative film.

  4. #14

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    In OP's situation, there is no need or benefit of pre-soaking in the tray. If the drum is still a little wet, then it is fine if you load the dry paper onto the wet drum. It is still better than soaking the paper in open tray, then trying to fit the paper to the drum filled with water.... Very messy and this can ruin the print easily.

  5. #15

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    Well, thank you all for sharing your experiences. I will try to load dry paper directly in not-totaly-dried drums.

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