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  1. #1
    ektachrome's Avatar
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    Ektachrome 50T??

    Hello
    I have just found a very old 100' roll of Ektachrome 50 Tungsten, dated 1989, in my freezer.
    It has been there since around 2005, after my grandfather gave it to me. He kept it in his fridge.

    I have noticed it is the same letter code, product code, etc.., as the newer Ektachrome 64T.
    I will post a photo later.

    Does anyone know what the difference is between the films, and how I should shoot it. Is it even worth shooting?

    Thanks
    ektachrome

  2. #2
    ektachrome's Avatar
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    Here are the photos of the box.
    Sorry about the crap quality, my phone camera sucks!

    ektachrome
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_20140905_191848.jpg   IMG_20140905_191900.jpg   IMG_20140905_191912.jpg  

  3. #3

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    The T in the name indicates that it is for designed for shooting in tungsten lighting situations. Essentially indoors with incandescent bulbs. Slide film of that age is probably going to come out monochrome blue or red. lt might be scannable but will be worthless for projecting

    It might be fun for us and cross processing, or processing with C 41 chemicals. The lomo kids might even buy it off of you if you hand roll it in charge 3 or 4 $ a roll
    "If its not broken, I can't afford it."

  4. #4
    ektachrome's Avatar
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    I have shot loads of 64T, so I know about tungsten film.
    What I would like to know, is why the speed of the film was increased, and whether it will be usable.

    Thanks anyway!
    ektachrome
    Kodachrome, Plus X, 669, 600, Ektachrome, BW400CN, FP3000B.
    Every time I find a film I like, they discontinue it!

    Long live film!

  5. #5

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    You'd probably have better luck trying to hatch a petrified dinosaur egg. Expect a blaaah image and a lot of crossover in the highlights. But maybe just as a fun experiment. It was decent stuff in its day, with a tad more latitude and better color balance than daylight films, though I
    personally preferred Fuji 64T.

  6. #6

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    It looks like your box say for "3200K".

    I thought that Ektachrome 64 was balanced for 3400K.

    You can get Photoflood bulbs for either temperature of light.
    Dave

    "She's always out making pictures, She's always out making scenes.
    She's always out the window, When it comes to making Dreams.

    It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up."

    From It's All Mixed Up by The Cars

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by mopar_guy View Post
    It looks like your box say for "3200K".

    I thought that Ektachrome 64 was balanced for 3400K.
    No, it was Kodachrome 40 that was balanced for 3400 K ("movie light").
    At the end of Ektachrome 64T (EPY), it was balanced for 3200 K.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by TimFox View Post
    No, it was Kodachrome 40 that was balanced for 3400 K ("movie light").
    At the end of Ektachrome 64T (EPY), it was balanced for 3200 K.
    Oops. My bad.
    Dave

    "She's always out making pictures, She's always out making scenes.
    She's always out the window, When it comes to making Dreams.

    It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up."

    From It's All Mixed Up by The Cars

  9. #9

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    Usually when manufacturers give you an oddball ISO like that, I think it's because of filtration. When you put a #85 filter on it to use it in daylight, you get a nice rounded 50 ISO. So basically it's a 50D film and 64T. Same with 160T.

    Edit: Actually I might be wrong about this. Does 85 take more than 1/3 stops?

  10. #10
    Athiril's Avatar
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    Custom first developer can restrain all fog and give much more decent slides than standard processing with old E-6 film. But I find a lot of these older Kodak slide films are not worth it due to poor grain and poor resolution and sharpness compared to what we have now (even when new).

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