Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 73,166   Posts: 1,614,405   Online: 994
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Flori-DUH
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    424
    Images
    1

    Questions about Fuji FP-100C

    Finally used some of my Polaroid FP-100C last night, and I have a couple of questions.

    After developing, how long does it take for the film to dry? ie., how long before you can stack photos without having any issues? I/we left them on the counter for about 30 minutes or more, but I noticed when I put them on the scanner, they con of 'stuck' a little. Nothing happened to the photos, but it made me question how long they should be left alone. I also noticed a fair amount of dust once scanned, which I think is now on the photo surface.

    As for the quality, they seem really good, but they certainly aren't as sharp as I was expecting. Fuji says the film has a resolution of 15 l/mm, which I'm guessing limits it's ability to reproduce 'tack sharp' images, am I correct?

    And a question that is probably more specific to my camera (Mamiya RB67 ProSD with Mamiya Polaroid back (not NPC)) - How much more is captured then what I'm seeing in the finder? It seems like a lot, and that I'm wasting a lot of film area. The photo below was framed almost to where she filled the frame vertically, but there seems to be quite a bit of headroom left unused.

    Here is a sample shot. I was focused on the eye closest to the camera, and it just doesn't seem as sharp as I was hoping.

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_20150104_0005.jpg  

  2. #2
    Fixcinater's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    127 Format
    Posts
    1,171
    Images
    30
    The negative will have more resolution than the positive print. FP3000B negs are quite noticeably better (sharper/more detailed) than the prints.

    If you can get them stacked vertically to dry somehow (I've seen people build holders from various materials into tupperware), you can reduce dust before scanning.

    Dry time seems to be affected by ambient temp and ambient weather, much more than I thought it would. Shot a bunch of 100C at the beach one cold foggy morning and imprinted my fingerprint on one of the positive prints after an hour of sitting in the car.

    100C and 3000B will both self-terminate so you won't have any issues with overdevelopment if you let them sit unpeeled for a while. I've done this for up to an hour in those damp/cold conditions, not sure how long you can go before they don't want to peel nicely.
    “One of the illusions of life is that the present hour is not the critical, decisive hour."

  3. #3
    cjbecker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    IN
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    797
    Images
    19
    I would always shoot one and open it to make sure my iso was correct, but after that I would shoot and put them in my camera bag. I would then open all at once to avoid the sticky and dust issue. (I shot a lot at weddings when I was second shooting)

    I also found the negative to be sharper. The 3000bw can't be bleached, but the 100c can. Just tape the negative to a piece of glass with the black side up, make sure it is water tight, apply bleach to black side, rub and the black paint will come off, let dry and you have negative.

  4. #4
    NedL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Sonoma County, California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,183
    Images
    20
    I've gone on some pretty long day trips and left them unpeeled until I got home, 8 or 10 hours at least. Kind of takes the fun out of instant film when you have to wait for a safe dust-free place to see them. I hang mine vertically in a closet, the sticky surface is a dust magnet. I've sometimes found them sticky even after 3 hours... so now I let them dry overnight before putting them in an album. I've had some ruined by sticking to the album plastic when I put them in too soon. As Fixcinater mentioned, some people make portable "drying boxes" to keep the pictures safe while they dry... I really need to make something like that!

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Lower Earth
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,522
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    39
    From my limited experience w/ Polaroid film, I never got a photo that was as sharp as conventional film. That's not the film's strength.

  6. #6
    winger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Page County, IA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,572
    Images
    47
    In 2014, I did an instant shot per week project (I knew I'd never be able to do a 365 photo project). I think I used slightly more 3000B than 100C, but those were all I used. No, the prints aren't as sharp as film. The negative for the 100C is a little more crisp than the print, but still not quite as sharp as film.
    To avoid dust I would put them in the bottom tray of a desktop file tray stack. I think most of the dust stuck to them right when they got peeled, though. I usually let them sit at least overnight before stacking them or scanning them.
    For framing, do you see the same thing with film? Many finders don't show exactly the area that the film gets (this may be more true with 35mm, but I'm not sure).

  7. #7
    mweintraub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    677
    Quote Originally Posted by Fixcinater View Post
    The negative will have more resolution than the positive print. FP3000B negs are quite noticeably better (sharper/more detailed) than the prints.
    I don't think you can reclaim a negative on 3000B

  8. #8
    Fixcinater's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    127 Format
    Posts
    1,171
    Images
    30
    You can scan the peeled side.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    “One of the illusions of life is that the present hour is not the critical, decisive hour."

  9. #9
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,449
    I thought the RB67 Polaroid back gave 7cm square images rather than rectangles?

    Oh - I guess it does - the unexposed area will be black so a square that's all black at the edges would look rectangular to the limits of the film area.

    I've never tried bleaching the negative but may need to do that.

  10. #10
    winger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Page County, IA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,572
    Images
    47
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    I thought the RB67 Polaroid back gave 7cm square images rather than rectangles?

    Oh - I guess it does - the unexposed area will be black so a square that's all black at the edges would look rectangular to the limits of the film area.

    I've never tried bleaching the negative but may need to do that.

    Oh duh - I should have thought of that. I've used a Polaroid back on my Hasselblad and it puts the square sorta off-center in the middle and there's black around the image. OP, please try a shot with a light background and you'll likely see what I mean.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin