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  1. #1
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    Current Fujichrome Longevity

    Hi Guys-

    Just out of curiousity...Does anyone know of any detailed information on the longevity of the developed images most current versions on the Fujichrome films? The Fuji publications say 20 years as the largest numver they offer with optimal storage conditions. I wonder what it really generally is. This does not seem very long to me, especially when I remember Ektachrome's published numver of years to be higher. Just wanted some APUG opinions.


    Pat
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

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    All dye based films are gonna fade at some point. It really depends on how well the film was developed, fixed and washed, how it was stored (exposure to light, type of box it's in, heat exposure, etc), and what the primary colours are in your images. Some are more fugitive than others. Yours might last 40 years, while mine might last 10. Or less. All of those factors determine longevity. The important thing to remember is that if you want stability, you need a silver based B&W film. If you're hand colouring things, you need pigment based colours, not dye.

    I only got serious about photography a short time ago. Less that 13 years. Most of the stuff I shot in the beginning was C41 colour or that B&W fake stuff, and I had places like Walgreens process it. Can't tell you how sad it was to have to throw out most of it recently because the cheap processing, and my lack of optimal storage, resulted in serious fading. The images just weren't there anymore.
    Last edited by momus; 01-26-2015 at 03:48 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Insert pithy philosophic statement of your choice here".

  3. #3
    wildbill's Avatar
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    If it helps, I recently opened an 8x10 box of the original velvia that expired in 1994. It has shifted towards magenta a bit but completely correctable in post. This doesn't answer your post processed question but 20+ yr old film that's still good to shoot.......
    www.vinnywalsh.com

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    The non-processed slide film contains still silver in it. Silver is an excellent anti-bacterial and anti-fungal agent. Once the film is processed correctly all the silver will be removed and that makes it susceptible to mold and degradation, especially in a moist environment. For this reason it is not possible to draw comparisons between processed and non-processed color films regarding archival characteristics.

  5. #5
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    Well I think in my own head I thought that current E-6 films have begun to reach the longevity of Kodachrome films. I'm totally aware that all films, especially color are likely to diminish in time, I just didn't realize that these E-6 films are thought to live so short! Kodak doesn't even mention anything that I can see about their current negative films. I have seen them advertising on their site that their papers will last quite a while. I think I have made too many assumptions here! As a young guy, I hope to make images that will look as good as the day I took them for at least the rest of my days
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  6. #6
    MDR
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    Theoretically it could reach a 100 years plus without major damage but unfortunately labs and pro labs never do/did real archival processing meaning longer washing of the film etc... everything is speed optimizes so the fixing is sub-optimal, the washing is sub-optimal etc.... The biggest killer of archival processing was the introduction of the quicklab/speedlab etc... 1hour photo kind of thing. Also slide films need to be projected from time to time or they will darken (does no fully apply the Kodachrome)

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    See http://www.wilhelm-research.com. Chapter 5, I believe, should provide the information you are looking for.
    An assortment of F-series Nikons (F to F6, excluding the F4) with quite a few Nikkors, a pair of M6s with some Leitz glass, a pair of 500c/ms with a wide range of Zeiss optics and, just to help keep Duracell solvent, a D800.

    Favourite films: (1). KE ("Kodachrome Era"): 35mm: PKM25 and PKR64, HP5/Tri-X; 120: PKR64, PanF, FP4. (2). PKE ("Post-Kodachrome Era"): (a) 35mm: E100G, HP5 Plus/Tri-X and Delta 3200; (b) 120: E100G, PanF Plus, FP4 Plus, TMax 100.

  8. #8
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    I have Fujichromes from the '60s and the '80s. Both are losing yellow dye and turning blue gradually. Storage of all of these are in the dark in a cool dry place (20/50). Kodachromes are unchanged from the same period, but Ektachromes vary all over the map. C41 films and C22 films from as early as the '50s seem to be doing well stored in the same place as the others.

    And, BTW, there are some biases built into the data presented by Wilhelm.

    PE

  9. #9

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    I appreciate the efforts made by Wilhelm; but because a number of his conclusions were based on extrapolations from accelerated aging tests
    (except for vintage materials), the real world permanence of these things often differs significantly in my own experience. There are just so many variables. I haven't seen any fading at all in my early Fujichromes or Ektachromes. I inherited a bunch of very early Kodachromes and Agfachromes, but in those cases, the great equalizer wasn't fading but mildew damage due to naive storage conditions without any air circulation.

  10. #10
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Speaking from the Pro Lab side of things , we have always done archival process and making prints from the early years to prove it.Still do, maybe why most people find
    our film processing cost too expensive.

    Quote Originally Posted by MDR View Post
    Theoretically it could reach a 100 years plus without major damage but unfortunately labs and pro labs never do/did real archival processing meaning longer washing of the film etc... everything is speed optimizes so the fixing is sub-optimal, the washing is sub-optimal etc.... The biggest killer of archival processing was the introduction of the quicklab/speedlab etc... 1hour photo kind of thing. Also slide films need to be projected from time to time or they will darken (does no fully apply the Kodachrome)

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